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TOWN OF ANDOVER 
1992 ANNUAL REPORT 




FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



Reginald S. Stapczynski 

Town Manager 

March 1993 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto1992ando 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 
1992 ANNUAL REPORT 



PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER PURSUANT TO THE 
PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS 
OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND ARTICLE II, 
SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTOGRAPH: 

MATT SAPIENZA, ANDOVER TOWNSMAN 
FEBRUARY, 1993 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 

Andover, MA 01810 

(508) 470-3800 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Andover: 

"We do know, however, that Andover soon had a 
working government, based on the principles of true and 
theoretical democracy in accordance with the English 
common law. The citizens managed their own affairs, 
subject to the regulations and supervision of the General 
Court. The process by which they groped their way toward 
an effective town organization were more easily arrived 
at because of the procedures laid down in older 
communities like Salem and Ipswich. Emergencies, they 
met them in their own fashion . " 

ANDOVER: Symbol of New England 

The Evolution of a Town 
by Claude M. Fuess 
Published in 1959 

The principles of our Town government, soon to be three 
hundred and fifty years of age, are based on democracy. It is 
evident every year in our Annual Town Election and Town Meetings. 
In 1992, there was the Annual Town Election and two Town Meetings. 
The Annual Town Meeting was held in April and a Special Town 
Meeting was held in early November. These town meetings, called to 
conduct official Town business, show the longevity of the effective 
Town organization that was established in 1646. 

This organization, grounded on the principles of democracy, 
has weathered the tests of time including the challenges that 
confronted us in 1992. The overriding challenge that we faced was 
that of maintaining high quality municipal services despite a 
shrinking amount of state aid from the Commonwealth. ■ In fact, 
Andover is presently receiving less state aid in gross dollars and 
less state aid as a percentage of the total Town budget than it did 
ten years ago. 

Despite the fiscal woes that confront us, the spirit of 
Andover thrives. The work of the Board in Selectmen in developing 
a vision statement for the Town reflects how passionately our 
elected officials care about what Andover will be like in the year 
2 000. Much of the Selectmen's work in 1992 dealt with their 
"Towards the 21st Century" project. - The Board of Selectmen 
developed a vision statement which is part of Chairman Charles H. 
Wesson, Jr. 's 1992 letter. Also, the department heads are working 



on individual mission statements for their own departments based on 
the overall vision statement established by the Board of Selectmen. 

In July, a program was started entitled "Quality in 
Government" . This program provides key Town and School officials 
with an opportunity to learn from leading businesses and industries 
in the Merrimack Valley how to improve the quality of municipal 
services. The intention of the "Quality in Government" series was 
to introduce the concept of Total Quality Management to the Town. 
Five speakers from companies represented in the Merrimack Valley 
have addressed this group. The themes they presented all revolved 
around how total quality and continuous improvement programs are 
operating in their own businesses and how, from their experiences, 
we can learn to use these principles and tools to continually 
improve municipal services. Andover, along with the Towns of 
Arlington and Danvers, received a joint training grant from the 
Executive Offices of Community Development to do total quality 
management training for the employees of these three 
municipalities . 

The following are particularly noteworthy highlights of 1992: 

The 1993 Capital Improvement Program saw its first full year 
of operation with the funding of numerous projects at the 1992 
Annual Town Meeting. The 1994 Capital Improvement Program was 
issued on October 1, 1992 and continues the theme of 
infrastructure repair and maintenance. 

In June, the Town Manager and the Andover Police Patrolmen's 
Union agreed to a three-year contract which was retroactive 
covering fiscal years 1990, 1991 and 1992. 

In July, the Town conducted a $3.9M bond offering which sold 
at an interest rate of 5%, the lowest since 1976. Also, the 
Town maintained its Aa bond rating despite the intense fiscal 
pressures placed on the Town and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts . 

In September, the Central Street bridge over the Shawsheen 
River was closed due to the failing structural supports. This 
bridge and the Stevens -Street bridge are scheduled to be 
replaced through the Commonwealth of Massachusetts funding on 
the following schedule: 

Central Street Bridge - to be replaced Spring/Summer 1993 
Stevens Street Bridge - to be replaced Summer/Fall 1993 

During the summer, the West Middle School received extensive 
renovations and repairs such as replacing lockers, renovating 
the toilet areas, installation of new curtains in the 
cafeteria, painting inside and outside, a new West Middle 
School sign was installed, new lighting and ceilings were 
installed in all of the corridor areas, thirteen sets of 
corridor doors were replaced, and the gymnasium floor was 



resanded and refinished. 

The Andover Chamber of Commerce honored our very own Inspector 
of Buildings Sam DeSalvo as their "Man of the Year" for his 
competent and compassionate service to the residents and 
developers of our community. 

As this letter points out, much was accomplished in 1992, 
however, much remains to be done in 1993 and the years ahead. The 
greatest challenge facing the Town in 1992 was the use of its 
resources to maintain the quality services our residents have come 
to expect. Providing these services in a tight fiscal environment 
and providing them in a way that they are continuously being 
improved will be the challenge of the future. The Town's 
management, department heads, and staff are always working towards 
delivering a better product to our customers at a cost which is 
within budget. This task is not accomplished alone. It is 
accomplished through team work and cohesive action on the part of 
all employees working towards the vision statement as developed by 
the Board of Selectmen. 

The 199 3 Annual Town Election will take place on Monday, March 
22, 1993 and the Annual Town Meeting will take start on Monday, 
April 12, 1993. Andover' s legacy as a "working government" goes 
back nearly three hundred and fifty years. The principles of 
democracy are as vital now as they were in 1646. Please 
participate in the Annual Town Meeting and Election in order to 
keep your stake in our democracy. Also, if you have the need, 
there will be "Day Care at Night" for young children of parents who 
are attending the Annual Town Meeting. 

Again, thank you very much to the Board of Selectmen, the 
department heads, and staff for their cooperation and assistance 
during 1992. I am confident by working together we can meet the 
challenges of 1993! 

Respectfully submitted, 



<y Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 





TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 

Andover, MA 01810 

(508) 470-3800 



Dear Citizens of Andover: 

The year 1992 will be remembered as a year of challenges and 
changes. The challenge that we continually face is one of 
providing quality municipal services for which Andover is known 
with shrinking revenue sharing from the Commonwealth. To this end, 
we proposed a program of Total Quality Management for our municipal 
employees. A series of meetings were held with a number of 
outstanding guest speakers from the community. A common theme of 
these meetings was improving quality in government. 

The changes that we have witnessed are numerous. On the 
national level we changed Presidents. Congressman Martin Meehan 
was elected our representive in Congress replacing Chester Atkins. 
On the State level we changed Senators. Senator Patricia McGovern, 
who did not seek re-election for the Senate seat, was replaced by 
our very own John O'Brien, former member of the Town of Andover' s 
Planning Board. For Pat, a longtime friend of the Town, we wish 
much success in her new role. For John, .we wish the wisdom of 
Solomon and the patience of Job in working on Beacon Hill for the 
residents of his district. 

The following are some highlights of 1992: 

"TOWARDS THE 2 1ST CENTURY" 

The Board of Selectmen spent a considerable amount of time 
thinking about the future of the- Town. The Board held outreach 
meetings in the community in order to obtain input from the 
citizens, both young and old, regarding their vision of the Town in 
the- 21st Century. The Board worked with skilled facilitator and 
Town resident, Michael Brassard, in determining the various 
elements that would make up a vision statement. The following 
vision statement was agreed upon by the Board of Selectmen: 

"The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way 
of life. Its legacy of democracy shall be preserved. 
Each citizen should experience the treasure of nature, 
history, individual respect, neighborhood and learning. 
As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from 
the past will be enriched in the present for those yet to 
be." 



At our meetings with residents, we heard many things but there 
was a common thread through many of the statements. People wanted 
Andover to be a lovely place to live where quality and not growth 
was the focus of the Town. Others expressed concern about wanting 
Andover to continue the tradition of excellence in education. 
Residents expressed their desire for the small-town New England 
atmosphere that we have been able to preserve in our community, 
especially the downtown and the green open spaces that make Andover 
so warm and inviting. 

The Board conducted an essay contest in conjunction with the 
Andover Townsman and the Andover School Department asking 
elementary school children how they envisioned the Town of Andover 
in the 21st Century. They wrote very intriguing and challenging 
essays regarding the future of their Town. Eight children were 
awarded first, second and third prize ribbons for the quality and 
vision that they captured in their essays. 

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 

The Annual Town Meeting funded the Capital Improvement Program 
for Fiscal Year 1993 and it included water main replacement in the 
residential area near downtown Andover, the replacement of the 
Bancroft Road pumping station, sidewalk replacement and repair on 
Shawsheen Road, Beacon Street, a small part of Lowell Street and 
part of Lincoln Street. Also, the Department of Public Works spent 
close to $800,000 to rebuild and/or resurface 10.4 miles of 
roadways comprising thirty-six streets. 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

A nine-member School Building Committee was instituted to 
address the overcrowding problems in the elementary and high school 
levels. The committee has been meeting to address the elementary 
school overcrowding problems first and has engaged an architect to 
work with them and produce a report dealing with a proposed 
solution to the overcrowding problem at the elementary level. The 
selected alternative by the committee, a new 450-seat elementary 
school at the upper Shawsheen playground, also known as Penguin 
Park, is currently on hold pending an evaluation of the Shawsheen 
School alternative by the School Committee. 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Board was invited to participate in the groundbreaking for 
a new 157,000 square foot facility at Genetics Institute on Lowell 
Junction Road. Governor Weld and numerous state and local 
dignitaries gathered for the symbolic groundbreaking and to honor 
the vision and foresight of Genetics Institute by selecting Andover 
for their corporate headquarters. Hewlett-Packard Company and 
Vicor Corporation are also actively expanding their facilities 
within the Town. 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

The CBD Committee had a great splash in May when they hosted 
"A Taste of Andover" at which time the Board of Selectmen honored 
sixty-four businesses that had located in Andover within the past 
eighteen months. The CBD Committee also recommended that the Board 
endorse a holiday parking program for employees in the Central 
Business District. This holiday parking program that allowed 
permit parking for the month of December was a tremendous success 
as forty-five people participated. Through the year, the Board had 
an on-going discussion regarding the appropriate parking fine and 
the Board voted to reduce the fine from $15.00 to $10.00 and 
finally, to $8.00. 

CLASSIFICATION OF PROPERTY 

In December the Board of Selectmen voted to maintain the 
distribution of the real estate tax burden between the residential 
and commercial/ industrial and personal property. The differential 
was' maintained at 120%. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Board met several times with the Council on Aging to 
discuss alternative sites for a new Senior Citizen Center. The 
Council has expressed its intent to do the necessary fundraising to 
build a new center. All they are asking from the Board of 
Selectmen is that the Town provide them with land on which they 
could build a new facility. At the present time, the Board and the 
Council is awaiting the decision on the reuse of the east wing of 
the Doherty Junior High School, now presently the administration 
building for the School Department and the Senior Citizen Center, 
in order to determine the future of the Senior Citizen Center 
facility. 

In closing, I would like to recognize the new Executive 
Director of the Greater Lawrence Chamber of Commerce Joseph 
Bevilacqua. His enthusiasm and energy will go a long way in 
improving the economic climate in the Merrimack Valley. Also, I 
would like to recognize Jack McKinnon, Andover resident and Vice 
President of the AT&T facility in North Andover. His facility 
is a 1992 winner of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award for 
excellence. And last but not least, I would like to thank the 
efforts of my colleagues on the Board of Selectmen. We have 
accomplished much in 1992 and it is due to the good working 
relationship that we have. The relationship that we have developed 
as a Board has allowed each of us to bring our own unique talents, 
interests and issues to the table where they are discussed in an 
atmosphere of openness and frank communication. The support that 
we have offered each other through the year has made my job as 
Chairman extremely enjoyable. 

Respectfully submitted for the 
Board of Selectmen, 




Charles H. Wesson, Jr, 
Chairman 



6 




ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, Massachusetts 01810 

(508) 470-3800 x401 

FAX (508) 475-8493 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE: nR MARkr „ M ~, ... . ANJ 

Susan E. ]enkins. Chairperson DR - MARK K / M cQUILLAN 

Christopher M. Outwin, Secretary Superintendent of Schools 

Susan T. Dalton 
William |. Huston, Jr. 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 

ANNUAL REPORT 
Andover School Department 



Serving a student population of approximately 5,082 students, 
the Andover Public Schools consists of four elementary schools, two 
middle schools, a high school, and K-2, open-enrollment Integrated 
Primary School. The Andover School Department employs 454 staff 
members, and it is overseen by five School Committee members who 
meet twice each month. The appropriation of $22,000,242 for the 
Andover School Department last April marked the beginning of yet 
another year of change for the students and parents of Andover. 
These changes were reflected in the initiatives started by the 
Andover School Committee to address overcrowding in Our 
elementary and secondary schools; by the Superintendent to 
continue work started last year in curriculum and instruction; by our 
Business Office to address the financing of building renovations, 
school construction, and school operations; and by the Personnel 
Department to broaden the range of services offered to citizens and 
employees. 

School Committee 

The Andover School Committee welcomed two new members 
last March with the election of Mr. William Huston and Ms. Mary 
Lyman. Ms. Lyman was formerly Personnel Director for the Town of 
Andover. Mr. Huston is currently the Curriculum Coordinator of the 
Interpreter Training Program, at Northern Essex Community College. 
Both were elected from a field of four candidates. 

With the arrival of these new members, the Committee moved 
rapidly to define its goals. Calling for (1) reexamination of the goals 
and curriculum of Andover High School (2) the renewal of Andover's 
curriculum systemwide (3) implementation of Total Quality 



Management and improved supervision (4) restoration and 
renovation of our school buildings and (5) the solution to Andover's 
elementary and secondary space problems, the Committee took these 
steps: 

• Requested the Town Manager to form a School Building 
Committee to develop solutions to overcrowding in our 
elementary schools and at Andover High School. 

• Directed the Superintendent to submit his Action Plan for 
1992-1993 by July, to commence the performance appraisal 
process in a timely manner, and to build on the goals 
established by the Committee. 

• Formed an Ad Hoc Committee for Finance to advise the 
Committee on the development of its annual budget and to 
offer suggestions on matters of financial policy. 

• Formed a School Building Oversight Committee to assist 
the Superintendent and School Committee on the 
development of maintenance policies and guidelines designed 
to ensure safe, attractive, learning environments. 

• Engaged in a search to hire a new Assistant Superintendent 
for Educational Services to replace Dr. Haslam who resigned 
to take the position of Superintendent of Schools in Harvard, 
Massachusetts. 

• Continued the services of Morgan, Brown & Joy to commence 
contract negotiations with the School Department's seven 
bargaining units. 

• Promoted a Special Town Meeting this fall to urge, the 
passage of a 2.4 million dollar bond article for school 
renovations. 

• Participated in the hiring of several new administrators for 
the Andover School Department. 

Notable Accomplishments 

As a result of this work, the Committee selected Ms. Eileen 
Woods, former Principal of Sanborn Elementary School, as its new 



Assistant Superintendent; helped pass a bond article in November; 
moved toward a contract settlement with the Andover Education 
Association, and assisted the Town Manager and the School Building 
Committee in deliberations over school renovations and construction. 



Central Administration 

To support the goals of School Committee, the Superintendent 
submitted his Action Plan for 1992-1993 on July 1. Contained in this 
plan were five broad goals: (1) An initiative to engage the Andover 
community, citizens, and Town officials in a close working 
relationship with the School Department and its schools (2) An 
initiative to develop safe, clean, well-maintained school buildings (3) 
A comprehensive plan to promote "total quality" in our schools with 
more extensive supervision of personnel and employees (4) the 
continuation of the Andover's Six-year Curriculum Renewal plan and 
(5) An initiative to promote community and school respect for 
individual differences and differences among the diverse ethnic, - 
racial, and learning populations in Andover. 

These goals were realized in several activities completed by the 
Superintendent and the Assistant Superintendent: 

• The development of a "Vision Statement" for the Andover 
Public Schools. 

• The development of "Mission Statement" for the Andover 
Public Schools, defining 15 Essential Learning Outcomes for 
all students. 

• Meetings of the Curriculum Councils and the Staff 
Development Commission. 

• Implementation of updated programs in Foreign Language, 
Health, and Social Studies. 

• Formation of and meetings with a K-12 Mainstreaming Task 
Force. 

• A "Secondary Symposium" to address the needs of Andover 
High School for the 90's and the year 2000. 

• Formation of and meetings with a community-based Equity 
Coalition Task Force. 

• Participation in the Town Manager's Quality in Government 
series. 

• Formation of Quality Circle Meetings. 

• Development of educational specifications for Andover High 



School, South and Sanborn Elementary Schools. 

• Regular meeting with the School Building Oversight 
Committee, and Municipal Maintenance resulting in the Fall 
Inspection of Schools in October and the creation of 
Preventive Maintenance Policy Handbook. 

• Regular meetings with the Ad Hoc Committee for Finance, 
resulting in broad, grass-roots support for the bond initiative 
this November. 

• Regular meetings with the Superintendent and the Andover 
Chamber of Commerce. 

• Speeches by the Superintendent to local civic organizations. 

Notable Accomplishments 

Throughout it all, the Superintendent was ably assisted by Ms. 
Woods, building administrators, and other school personnel. The 
School Department was recently honored when the Henry C. Sanborn 
Elementary School was selected as the only public school in 
Massachusetts to receive the Blue Ribbon for Excellence awarded by 
the Federal Department of Education. Ms. Woods and members of 
the Sanborn community will travel to Washington, D.C., to be honored 
by the President, along with other national Blue Ribbon recipients. 

Business Department 

In support of the Superintendent's, if not all administrators' 
Action Plans, the Business Department continued to provide technical 
and financial support for all initiatives established by the Andover 
School Committee. Mr. Paul and his Department listed four goals as 
essential for the 1992-1993 school year: (1) Renovation and 
preventive maintenance of all school buildings (2) Development of 
financial and enrollment data needed for decisions affecting school 
construction and (3) Continuation of the School Committee's 
Transportation Policy and (4) Development and implementation of 
the Annual Budget. 

To these ends, Mr. Paul and his department: 

• Provided the leadership needed to help complete over 
$540,000 in capital projects in the schools over the summer 
months most notably at West Middle School. 

• Worked closely with the Ad Hoc Committee for Finance and 



10 



the School Building Oversight Committee to promote the 2.4 
million dollar bond article, and to develop long-range 
preventive maintenance program for all schools. 

• Developed financial projections for the Town Manager's 
Capital Improvement Plan, submitted to the Selectmen in 
October. 

• Advised the School Committee on contract negotiations, 
offering two- and three-year projections, relative to the 
Finance Department's estimates of growth and operating 
expenses. 

• Effectively collected bus fees and established cost-effective 
bus routes for students K-12. 

• Worked closely with the Personnel Department to effectuate 
all financial arrangements relative to health care costs, 
salaries and stipends. 

Notable Accomplishments 

The Business Department helped the Superintendent and 
School Committee maximize the dollars appropriated to the School 
Department and effectuate savings. Renovations at West Middle 
School, in particular, stood out as a major accomplishment over the 
summer. The loss of Mr. Paul, who retired on January 6, 1993, will 
be keenly felt in the months and years ahead. 

Personnel Department 

Like the Business Office, the Personnel Department provided 
continuous services to the Superintendent and all School and Town 
employees. Apart from managing health care benefits, assisting the 
Superintendent and Town Manager in labor issues, and overseeing 
the recruitment, hiring, and retirement of employees, Ms. Hall and 
her Department tackled several noteworthy projects this year. 
Among other things, she and her staff: 

• Sponsored a variety of health and safety training programs 
for staff, notably "Right to Know" training, drug-free 
workplace training, and immunization programs for 
Hepatitis B. 



11 



• Selected a new occupational health provider (Corporate 
Medical Services), while expanding the visibility of the 
Employees' Assistance Bureau. 

• Selected a new Benefits Assistant, as part of a departmental 
reorganization. 

• Oversaw all job searches for new teachers, the Principals of 
West Elementary School, Doherty Middle School, and South 
School, the Assistant Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant 
Principal for West Elementary School. 

• Assisted the Superintendent on all personnel transfers, 
labor issues, and legal obligations accompany the School 
Department's contracts with certified and non-certified 
employees. 

• Actively promoted affirmative action recruitment of minority 
applicants. 

• Assisted the Superintendent of Schools in the formation of 
Quality Circles, the Equity Coalition Task Force, and Total 
Quality Management Training. 

Notable Accomplishments 

Ms. Hall and her new staff have now completed their first year 
working together since the passing of Marie Cunningham. Over the 
summer months she and her staff processed over 1,500 applications 
for a variety of school appointments. 

Other Achievements 

Bancroft Elementary School 

•Community Partnerships 

•Evening Seminar Series for Parents 

Sanborn Elementary School 

•National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence Award 
•Genetics Institute Enrichment Program 



12 



Shawsheen Integrated Primary 

•Introduction of the Shawsheen Explorer 

•Implemented "Love Your Neighbor" Community Service Project 

South Elementary School 

•Project Learning Tree: Museum of Science 
•Implemented Theme: "We're All Part of the Picture." 

West Elementary 

•Implemented School-Wide Theme: "Caring and Cooperation" 
•New Playground Facilities, and Improved Physical Plan 

Dohertv Middle School 

•Implemented a new schedule featuring diverse enrichment courses. 
•Implemented Foreign Language Program for all middle school 
students. 

West Middle School 

•Completion of major building renovations 
•"West Fest" Fundraiser 

Andover High School 

•Secondary Symposium: "Building on Tradition, Heading to the 

Future" 
•"Project Teamwork": Promoting Respect for Diversity 

Athletics 

•Andover teams continue to win in the Top 5 at all varsity levels. 
•Recognition of student athletes and Coaches Program. 

Fine Arts 

•Andover Marching Band Places First in Division One Competition 
•Twenty-eight musicians qualify for Northeastern Junior District. 



13 



Health 

•Adoption of new program: "The Great Body Shop." 
•Development of the School Department AIDS/HIV policy. 

Physical Education 

•Establishment of "Project Challenge" at Andover High School 
•Superior performance of students on "President's Challenge" for 
physical fitness 

Special Education 

•Mainstreaming Task Force 

•Evening Seminar Series Sponsored by the Special Education PAC. 



Technology/Media 

•Macintosh training for all School Administrators. 
•Implementation of MCET Program 



14 



TOWN CLERK 

The Town had a busy Election year in 1992! The following 
figures show the voter turnout for the four elections held in 1992: 



Presidential Primary, March 10th: 7,047 
Town Election, March 23rd: 2,455 
State Primary, September 15th: 6,250 
General Election, November 3rd: 16,927 



- 40% of registered voters 

- 14% of registered voters 

- 35% of registered voters 

- 88% of registered voters 



1,542 absentee ballots were processed for the General 
Election. 

3,017 new voters were registered by the Board of Registrars in 
1992 compared to 605 new registrations in 1991 - a 500% increase. 
The Board also certified. 8 , 063 nomination and initiative petition 
papers. With the increase in the number of elections during 1992, 
the year ended with 19,078 registered voters - an increase of 10% 
over 1991. Registered voters in the Town's 8 precincts are as 
follows: 



1 - 1965 

2 - 2347 



3 - 2328 

4 - 2572 



5 - 2648 

6 - 2373 



7 - 2426 

8 - 2419 



In January, the Town Census was mailed to 11,859 households 
(population of 31,076) compared to 10,799 households in 1991 
(population of 29,484) - an increase of 10%. 



1991 



1992 



Births Recorded: 

Marriages Recorded: 

Deaths Recorded: 

Dog Licenses Sold: 

Fishing & Hunting Licenses Sold: 

Population: 

MONIES COLLECTED - 1992: 



235 


315 


194 


201 


190 


228 


1,709 


1,796 


713 


739 


29,484 


31,076 



Marriage Licenses 

Certified Copies 

Uniform Commercial Code Filings 

Miscellaneous Licenses Income 

Liquor Licenses Income 

Business Certificate Filings 

Miscellaneous Income (Street Lists, Maps, etc.) 

Dog Licenses 

Non Criminal Violations 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 

TOTAL 



$ 2,985.00 

8,583.00 

4,736.00 

14,965.00 

94,800.00 

3,170.00 

9,909.96 

7,416.00 

1,775-00 

13 ,837.70* 

$162,177.66 



* $13,472.00 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries 
and Game — $365.70 was retained by the Town of Andover. 



15 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 1993 budget was 
released on January 17, 1992. During the months of January, 
February and March, approximately twenty meetings were held with 
the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to 
review budget and warrant article requests and prepare 
recommendations for the Annual Town Meetings. 

In early April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to 
over 11,000 households. The Annual Town Meeting was held on April 
13, 1992 and the fiscal year 1993 budget (Article 4) was adopted in 
the amount of $54,638,594. This budget was an increase of 2.7% 
from the Fiscal Year 1992 budget of $53,221,177. 

The Town issues $3,990,000 in general obligation bonds in 
June, 1992 to permanently fund various water, sewer, school, 
sidewalk and traffic signal projects. Moody's Investor Service 
rated these bonds as AA and the interest cost of 5% was the lowest 
rate since 1976. 

The Fiscal Year 1994-1998 Capital Improvement Program was 
released on October 1, 1992. Approximately $45 million in 
municipal and school projects were recommended. 

In November, the Board of Selectmen held its tax 
classification public hearing upon completion of the revaluation of 
property by the Board of Assessors. The Board of Selectmen voted 
to keep the tax factor at 120% for Fiscal Year 1993. The tax rate 
was established at $14.10 for residential property and open space 
and $18.3 6 for commercial, industrial and personal property. 

The Andover Cable Advisory Committee met monthly to discuss 
any matters involving Heritage Cablevision and its service to 
Andover customers . 

ASSESSING 

In 1992, the Board of Assessors contracted for a new appraisal 
system. The system, as contracted from Patriot Properties of 
Peabody, Massachusetts, will provide the public with direct 
informational access through counter terminals, faster processing 
of telephone requests, and an opportunity to expand the system into 
computer-generated photographs . 

In conjunction with the installation of new appraisal 
software, the Board of Assessors has contracted for a complete 
reinspection of all property in Andover. This task will take place 
throughout the next year and will culminate in new property 
valuations for fiscal year 1994. This data collection process will 
insure that property taxation remains fair and equitable for 
Andover taxpayers. 



16 



CENTRAL PURCHASING 

During 1992, there were approximately 1,661 orders processed 
for the Town and 2,690 orders processed for the School Department. 
Approximately 4 6 bid openings were held. The continued use of 
State bids and contracts has proved to be beneficial to the 
taxpayers of Andover. 

Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political 
subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide range of 
goods and services such as: paper products for copy machines, 
police vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels and 
supplies. 

Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in 
1992 are as. follows: 

Finance Committee report 

Removal, replacement and repair of roofing and flashing and 

associated work at Andover Town Offices 

Sidewalks 

Sewers 

Water mains 

School supplies and equipment 

School Lunch (7 items) 

Highway Department equipment 

Water meters 

Miscellaneous road materials and concrete pipes 

Painting of road markings 

Surface water drainage 

Office supplies, equipment, and furniture 

The Office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract 
compliance regarding Andover 's Affirmative Action Plan, and 
insurance coordination and risk management for all Town and School 
departments with the exception of health and personal insurance 
which was handled by the Personnel Department. 

Areas of importance in the early 90 's where Central Purchasing 
and insurance coordination were able to save dollars for the Town 
are as follows: 

Collaborative bid on Gasoline & Diesel Fuel involving 12 towns 
Collaborative bid on Fuel Oil (#2 & #4) involving 7-10 towns 
Collaborative bid on copy machine paper involving 7 towns 
Collaborative bid on Student Insurance involving 5 towns 
Introduction of a new catastrophe Accident Medical 
Insurance/or Interscholastic Athletics 
- Coverage for all Interscholastic Athletics and Band activities 
Introduction of various other insurance coverages available to 
students throughout the year 

Contracts for various major projects throughout the Town 
Creation of Safety Handbook for all Town and School employees 
Establishing safety programs for all Town and School employees 



17 



Introduction of various programs to the advantage of the Town 
and School employees 

Town Purchase Orders 

1990 1991 1992 

1650 1817 1661 
School Department Orders 

9000 3111 2690 
Town Requests for Payment 

3500 3800 4151 

DATA PROCESSING 

During 1992, the Data Processing Division continued to 
maintain and improve the existing application software on the 
Town's centralized computer system. 

All IRS tax forms which show earnings for employees, retirees 
and vendors were submitted by magnetic tape rather than by paper, 
keeping the Town in compliance with the IRS regulations for wage 
reporting. In lieu of withholding Social Security tax, an ICMA PTS 
retirement computerized process was programmed so that all PTS 
deductions, as well as regular deferred compensation deductions, 
for both the Town and School, can now be transmitted to the ICMA 
Corporation via magnetic tape. This provides the Treasurer's 
office with a more efficient way to process these deductions. 

Three years of retroactive pay for the police patrolmen was 
calculated by the Data Processing Division and the Accounting 
Office. 

At the end of 1992, the existing payroll software was replaced 
with a revised package which also incorporates the areas of 
personnel and budget. This package will allow more effective use 
of payroll data for personnel requirements and budgeting purposes. 

The Town Clerk's office received a new application designed to 
assist in the certification of petitions. This program provides a 
more efficient way to certify signatures and provides a permanent 
record of the certified voters who sign each petition. 

Computerized interest calculation on late real estate tax 
payments was instituted this year. This allows more payments to be 
processed automatically without manual input and also provides the 
taxpayer with an immediate interest figure when requested. 



18 



COLLECTOR /TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer's Department is responsible for the 
collection and disbursement of all Town monies including trust 
funds, department receivables and borrowed bond funds. 

Real & Personal Taxes 

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 

$29,556,000 $33,725,000 $34,708,000 $37,047,000 $37,966,000 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

$ 2,360,000 $ 2,329,000 $ 2,209,000 $ 1,997,000 $ 1,742,000 

Total Collections through the Treasurer's Department 

$37,806,000 $43,625,000 $44,199,000 $48,697,000 $50,728,000 

VETERANS SERVICES 

Twenty-one families were assisted in 1992 with funds to help 
pay for food, fuel, medical and personal needs. These expenditures 
are reimbursed 75% to the Town by the State according to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 115. 

Eleven veterans were admitted to Veterans Administrations 
Hospitals. Thirty-five Andover veterans died in 1992 - one World 
War I veteran, twenty-four World War II veteran, six Korean War 
veterans, three Vietnam War veterans and one from the Persian Gulf 
War. 



19 





FY1990 


FY1991 


FY1992 


FY1993 


EXPENDITURES 










Appropriations & Articles 


52,909,066 


54,852,093 


53,196,677 


54,796,857 


Other Local Expenditures: 










Tax Title Purposes 


15,325 


24,600 


25,000 


40,000 


Final Court Judgements 


183,552 





40,156 


162,482 


Overlay/ Other Deficits 





161,617 


529,416 


90,922 


Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 


82,981 


73,736 


62,860 


533.403 


Revenue/Other Deficits 


1,720 











Total Local Expenditures 


283,578 ■ 


259,953 


657,432 


826,807 


State and County Charges 


767,498 


901,683 


941 ,683 


1 ,023,998 


Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 


499,566 


713,315 


704,669 


643,348 


54.459,708 


56,727,044 


55,500,461 


57,291.010 


EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 










Estimated Receipts from State: 










Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 


4,986,307 


4,615,768 


2,979,927 


3,420,951 


Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 


3,571 


14,430 


5,128 


21 ,999 


Total from State 


4,989,878 


4,630,198 


2,985,055 


3,442,950 


Estimated Local Receipts: 










Local Estimated Receipts 


8,862,000 


11,454,500 


11,134,111 


10,670,000 


Offset Receipts 


2,425,174 


458.684 


513,462 


609,429 


Total Local Receipts 


11,287,174 


11,913,184 


11,647,573 


11,279,429 


Free Cash and Other Revenue: 










Free Cash - Articles 


379,697 


62,099 


1,000 


264 


Other Available Funds 


469,021 


395,546 


287,031 


244,453 


Revenue Sharing 













Total Other Appropriations 


848,718 


457,645 


288,031 


244,717 


Free Cash - Operating Budget 
TOTAL ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 


420,000 


670,000 








17,545,770 


17,671,027 


14,920,659 


14,967,096 


TOTAL PROPERTY TAXES 


36,913,938 


39,056,017 


40.579,802 


42.323,914 


TOTAL REVENUES 


54,459,708 


56,727,044 


55,500,461 


57,291,010 



VALUATIONS & TAX RATES 










TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 


FY1990 


FY1991 


FY1992 


FY 1993 


3,283,609 


3,115,574 


2,803,016 


2,766,943 


RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 


10.40 


11.42 


13.26 


14.10 


COMMERCIAL TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


18.36 


INDUSTRIAL TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


18.36 


PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX RATE 


12.92 


15.04 


17.37 


18.36 


EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


11.24 


12.54 


14.48 


15.30 



WHERE REVENUES 










COME FROM 

STATE AID 


FY1990 


FY1991 


FY1992 


FY 1993 


9.16% 


8.16% 


5.38% 


6.01% 


LOCAL REVENUE 


20.73% 


21 .00% 


20.99% 


19.69% 


OTHER FUNDS 


1 .56% 


0.81% 


0.52% 


0.43% 


FREE CASH 


0.77% 


1.18% 


0.00% 


0.00% 


PROPERTY TAXES 


67.78% 


68.85% 


73.12% 


73.88% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



20 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
12-31-92 



STATE EQUALIZED VALUATION 



3,436,701,000.00 



BORROWING CAPACITY 5% 



171,835,050.00 



TOWN DEBT 12-31-91 



20,790,000.00 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 
1 975-WEST ANDOVER SEWER 
1976-WATER 
1984-WATER 
1986-WATER 
1987-WATER 

1988-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
1989-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 
1990-WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

1992-WATER 

DEBT INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 
1976-CONSERVATION LAND 
1984-PARKING FACILITY 
1984-TOWN HALL 
1986-SEWER 
1986-RIVER ROAD 
1986-LAND ACQUISITION 
1987-SEWER 

1989-SCHOOL COMPUTERS 
1989-LAND ACQUISITION 
1989-SEWER 
1990-SEWER 
1990-LAND ACQUISITION 
1 990-SCHOOL COMPUTERS 
1990-HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 

1992-SEWER 
1992-TRAFF1C SIGNALS 
1992-HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 
1992-BPW PLANS 
1992-SIDEWALKS 



345 
135 
500 

3,060 
120 

1,100 

3,858 
876 

2,320 



,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,750.00 
,500.00 
,000.00 



120, 
200, 
150, 
3,010, 
430, 
300, 
150, 
93, 
234, 
238, 
799, 
707, 
100, 
272, 



000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
750.00 
500.00 
000.00 
300.00 
000.00 
000.00 
200.00 



730,000.00 
110,000.00 
30,000.00 
500,000.00 
300,000.00 



12,315,250.00 



8,474,750.00 



BORROWING CAPACITY 

LEASES 
1984-TOWN HALL 
1985-TOWN HALL 
1987-LIBRARY 
1990-TOWN HALL 
1990-LIBRARY 



132,750.00 
1,730,000.00 

440,000.00 
2,370,000.00 
3,460,000.00 



DEBT 
LEASES 
VOTED NOT 
BONDED 



163,360,300.00 
TOTAL DEBT 

20,790,000.00 
8,132,750.00 
7,460,721.47 



8,132,750.00 



TOTAL 



36,383,471.47 



21 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1992 









BALANCE 








BALANCE 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY 1,1991 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


JUNE 30, 1992 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




770,882.79 


-60,000.00 


46,143.09 




877,025.88 


RETIREMENT 


TOWN 




97,764.58 




622.43 


98,367.01 


(0.00) 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




591,394.93 




34,942.28 




626,337.21 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




320,482.04 




14,274.74 


40,000.00 


294,756.78 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATI 




128,275.41 


90.000.00 


4, 148.40 


210,000.00 


12,423.81 


POST WAR REHABILITATION 


TOWN 




31,099.59 


29,000.00 


1,446.09 


32,000.00 


29,545.68 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5.766.63 


8,520.38 




406.38 


662.00 


8,264.76 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




8, 144.48 




415.98 


180.96 


8,379.50 


STATE GRANT MDCR 






0.00 








0.00 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






177.25 




10.85 




188.10 


CD4P-ROGERS BROOK 






18,910-20 




818.95 


15,948.01 


3,781.14 


TDJ-SPECIAL 




14,300.00 


2.151.95 




93.51 


2,241.87 


3.59 


PWED-SPECIAL TOWN 




200,000.00 


76,367.00 




2,941.36 


16,902.31 


62,406.07 


TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 






175,233.39 


3,946,521.61 


9,048.00 


3,608,095.17 


522,707.83 


M.V. LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LIBRARY 




316,334.12 


533,910.00 


22,662.87 


250,000.00 


622,906.99 


J. GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




308.50 


308.50 


5,000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345,825.50 


345,825.50 








345,825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




132,656.77 


- 


18,233.16 


38,989.20 


111,900.73 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5,000.00 


28,120.37 




1,877.94 


280.00 


29,718.31 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


26,923.30 




1,606.92 


2,000.00 


26,530.22 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


24,618.62 


45.90 


1,506.66 




26,171.18 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


14,046.50 




675.06 




14,721.56 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWER S 


1,302.77 


1,500.00 




91.80 


91.80 


1.500.00 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


897.78 




54.94 




952.72 


SPRING GROVE 






501,254.94 


20.381.95 


23,952.95 


3,062.50 


542,527.34 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




17,709.73 








17.709.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERSET 




1,942.50 




118.88 


118.88 


1,942.50 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 




95,900.24 


10,160.00 


4,506.48 




110,566.72 


WEST PARISH 






2.310.00 




141.37 


141.37 


2,310.00 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7.610.00 




465.73 


465.73 


7,610.00 


ST. AUGUSTINES 






650.00 




39.78 


39.78 


650.00 


EMILINE LINCOLN 


A.V.I. S 




1,000.00 




61.20 


61.20 


1,000.00 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


A.V.I .S 


1,000.00 


544.60 




33.33 


33.33 


544.60 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 




29,455.36 




1,850.38 


921.97 


30,383.77 


SUNSET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 




7,283.52 




330.80 




7,614.32 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




22,209.50 


600.00 


1,182.32 


39.94 


23,951.88 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1,000.00 


7,036.02 




430.60 


50.00 


7,416.62 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




12.09 


60.00 


3.35 


82.44 


13.00 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1,068.86 




65.41 


30.00 


1,104.27 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.86 


910.07 




55.70 


25.00 


940.77 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


198.11 




12.12 


15.00 


195.23 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


7,487.52 




458.24 




7,945.76 


RICHAROSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


5,814.81 




355.87 




6,170.68 


A. & A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


3,905.59 




239.02 




4,144.61 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 








598.50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






1,001.73 


106.00 


61.37 


200.00 


969.10 


CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250.00 


756.26 




46.28 




802.54 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


557.66 




34.13 




591.79 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 
DS 


50.00 


341.94 




20.93 




362.87 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUN 


3,842,866.50 


4,690,805.46 


196,796.17 


4,321,373.97 


4,409,114.16 



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25 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long- 
term resident of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to 
the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. 
Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from 
this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement of 
assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who 
may be in need of aid, comfort or support on account of old age, 
disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen 
by the Town Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance with the 
terms of Mrs. Towle' s will. The cases are referred to the Trustees 
by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and 
interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on 
seventeen (17) cases, disbursing $20,764.73 on approved cases 
(which numbered 17) and small administration expenses. Only the 
income of the Fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and 
a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the 
direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town 
Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1991 $135,763.50 
Receipts - 1992 17,947.13 

$130,411.98 • 
Disbursements - 1992 20,764 . 73 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1992 $109,647.25 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 
17 of the 1983 Annual Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left 
to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to purchase wood or 
coal. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the 
Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 

Balance on hand 7/1/91 $28,120.37 
Income 1991/1992 1,877.94 

Disbursed 280. 00 

Balance as of 7/1/92 $29,718.31 



26 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 , 1992 

SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



01/01/02 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



12/31/92 



PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 
SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 
COST OR MARKET 



32.740.00 -GAIN ON SALE OF SECURITIES 
100.530.06 -BROKERAGE FEES/TAX 

-INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 
-TRANSFERS FROM RESERVE FUND 

0.00 -ADJUSTMENT TO COST/MARKETRESERVE 



31 ,01 8.75 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 
(3.290.57) SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
(1,796.00) 
2.460.52 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 
0.00 COST OR MARKET 



0.00 
162,501.26 



0.00 



133,280.56 



DECREASE 



20.301.70 



162,591.26 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 

(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



CASH IN BANK -SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



4.320.75 DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 

2,288.30 INTEREST RECEIVED-BONDS/NOTES 

6,421.72 INTEREST RECEIVED -OTHER 



2,235.00 CASH IN BANK -SAVINGS 4,473.97 

2.784.70 CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 1,956.41 

1,492.70 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 4,804.67 

ACCRUED INTEREST 388.99 



1 3,030.77 INCOME TOTAL 

EXPENSES 



0,512.40 



11,624.04 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 
MISC. OPERATING EXPENSES 



5,034.14 
415.56 



EXPENSE TOTAL 



5,440.70 



NET GAIN 
TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 
-10% OF INCOME (1/1-12/31/02) 
-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 
-TO ADJ FOR SECURITIES PURCHASED 



1,062.70 

651.00 

1,152.76 (7/1/91 - 6/30/92) 
665.76 



DECREASE 



(1 ,406.73) 



146,320.33 



TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



174.215.30 



27 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

FUND ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1992 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



BOOK 
VALUE 



0.00 



MARKET 
VALUE 



MARKET VALUE 

OVER 

BOOK VALUE 



0.00 



0.00 



SECURITIES 
STOCK 



100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
50 SHARES 
100 SHARES 
100 SHARES 



ABBOTT LABS 

AIR PROD & CHEMICAL INC 

ALBERTSONS INC 

AUTOMATAIC DATA PROCESSING 

CENTRAL & SOUTHWEST CORP 

EXXON CORP 

KIMBERLY CLARK CORP 

MOTOROLA INC 

PEPSICO 

SARA LEE CORP 

SCHLUMBEGER LTD 

WACHOVIA CORP 

WALL MART STORES INC 

TOTAL STOCK 



OTHER 



$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.00%, DUE 11/30/97 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 8.125%, DUE 2/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 7.125%, DUE 10/15/98 
$15,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.375%, DUE 8/15/02 
$10,000 PEPSICO INC NOTE, 6.250%, DUE 9/1/99 
$10,000 AMER. TEL & TEL DEB, 7.000%, DUE 2/15/01 
$10,000 AMER. TEL & TEL DEB, 7.125%, DUE 12/1/03 
$10,000 IBM NOTE, 7.25%, DUE 1 1/1/02 

TOTAL OTHER 

TOTAL SECURITIES 



RESERVE-LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



3,050.00 
4,737.50 
4,575.00 
5,062.50 
2,812.50 
5.887.50 
5,762.50 
6,425.00 
4,075.00 
5,875.00 
3,350.00 
6,562.50 
6,225.00 



3,037.50 
4,675.00 
5,050.00 
5,312.50 
2,912.50 
6,112.50 
5,900.00 
10,450.00 
4,150.00 
6,000.00 
2,862.50 
6,825.00 
6,400.00 



(12.50) 

(62.50) 

475.00 

250.00 

100.00 

225.00 

137.50 

4,025.00 

75.00 

125.00 

(487.50) 

262.50 

175.00 



64,400.00 


69,687.50 


5,287.50 


14,955.30 


14,971.80 


16.50 


14,680.58 


16,293.75 


1,613.17 


J 14,878.13 


15,604.65 


726.52 


14,412.90 


14,671.80 


258.90 


9,740.00 


9,675.00 


(65.00) 


9,862.50 


10,012.50 


150.00 


9,787.50 


9,975.00 


187.50 


9,874.35 


9,975.00 


100.65 


98,191.26 


101,179.50 


2,988.24 


162,591.26 


170,867.00 


8,275.74 


0.00 






162.591.26 


170.867.00 


8.275.74 



RESERVE FUND 



RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS BANK PRIME ACCOUNT 
ACCRUED INTEREST 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



4,473.97 
388.99 
4,804.67 
9.667.63 9.667.63 



0.00 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 
BAYBANK 

TOTAL FUNDS 



1.956.41 



1.956.41 



174.215.30 182.491.04 



0.00 



8.275.74 



28 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1992 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 







CURRENT 










BALANCE 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 




1/1/91 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/92 


H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 


3,438.31 


264.55 


3,702.86 


0.00 


3,702.86 


J.W.BARNARD 


6,945.76 


534.42 


7,480.18 


0.00 


7,480.18 


ALICE M.BELL 


1,018.18 


78.34 


1,096.52 


0.00 


1 ,096.52 


EDNA G.CHAPIN 


2.323.55 


178.78 


2,502.33 


0.00 


2,502.33 


FRED W.DOYLE 


12,464.22 


959.03 


13,423.25 


1 ,000.00 


12,423.25 


WARREN F.DRAPER 


1,514.94 


116.56 


1 ,631 .50 


0.00 


1,631.50 


WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 


1 ,768.79 


136.09 


1 ,904.88 


0.00 


1 ,904.88 


ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 


1,018.17 


78.34 


1,096.51 


0.00 


1,096.51 


MYRON E.GUTTERSON 


1,020.33 


78.51 


1,098.84 


0.00 


1 ,098.84 


ANDOVER GRANGE 


2,491.61 


191.71 


2,683.32 


0.00 


2,683.32 


PUNCHARD. TRUSTEES 


10,351.14 


796.44 


11,147.58 


1,000.00 


10,147.58 


RESERVE- COST OR MKT. 


0.00 


(408.50) 


(408.50) 


0.00 


(408.50) 




44.355.00 


3.004.27 


47.359.27 


2.000.00 


45.359.27 



750.40 


834.26 


2,575.00 


(127.49) 


(262.39) 


(357.00) 


(408.50) 


3.004.28 



SUMMARY- INCOME/(EXPENSE) 

INTEREST INCOME 
DIVIDEND INCOME 

GAIN/(LOSS) ON SALE OF SECURITES 
BANK PENALTY 
BROKERAGE FEES 
INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEES 
ADJ.TO LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 
NET INCOME 



FUNDS/SECURITIES HELD . 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS PURCHASED 

100 SHARES DUN & BRADSTREET CORP 

200 SHARES GREENARY REHABILITATION GROUPS INC. 

50 SHARES NICHOLS INSTITUTE -NEW 

50 SHARES NICHOLS INSTITUTE CL C -NON VTG. 

350 SHARES ROLLINS ENVIRONMENTAL SVCS 

$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.00%, 11/30/97 

$5,000 PEPSICO INC NOTE, 6.250%,9/1 /99 

$5,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.375%, 8/15/02 

$5,000 IBM NOTE, 7.25%, 11/1/02 

$10,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE, 6.000%, 12/31/97 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



MARKET 


BOOK 


VALUE 


VALUE 


3,887.67 


3,887.67 


146.66 


146.66 


5,775.00 


4,262.50 


850.00 


1 ,650.00 


312.50 


700.00 


275.00 


700.00 


4,418.75 


4,812.50 


4,990.60 


4,985.10 


4,837.50 


4,870.00 


4,890.60 


4,804.30 


4,987.50 


4,961.85 


9,987.50 


9,987.20 




(408.50) 


45,359.28 


45,359.28 



29 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The Library as a Treasure Trove 

The best bargain in Town is the Library. Why? Because for 
your tax dollar, which is the equivalent of the price of one video 
or two cassette tapes or two fiction books or one magazine 
subscription, you can have access to over: 

175,000 adult books 
40,000 childrens books 
1,400 sound cassettes (music) 
1,500 compact discs 
242 books on tape 
2,600 videos 
400 periodicals 
300 programs 
9 museum passes 

plus inter-library loan availability region-wide, state- 
wide, country-wide and world-wide. 

Nowhere does your tax dollar stretch so far! 

Other interesting information: 

Andover is the 48th largest city/town in Massachusetts. 

The Memorial Hall Library ranks 9th in Massachusetts in amount 
of materials circulated. 

The Memorial Hall Library ranks 2nd in per capita circulation 
in cities/towns over 20,000 population. 

The Memorial Hall Library has less staff than other comparable 
libraries with less circulation. It has less staff than it 
did in 1980. 

1,400 people use the Memorial Hall Library on an average 
weekday. 

An estimated 3 00,000 people use the Memorial Hall Library per 
year. 

Almost half a million items were circulated in 1992. 

The Reference Department reports that questions most asked are 
about investment services, job search and help wanted ads, business 
profiles, college and scholarship information, car prices, product 
evaluations, travel information, medicine and drugs, biographical 
information, school assignment research and instructions in 
equipment use, computers and magazine indexes. 



30 



CIRCULATION 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

1992 1991 



1990 



Adult Books & Print 


204168 


200481 


194576 


Children's Books & Print 


161749 


154492 


143486 


Young Adult Books 


9276 


7488 


6273 


Periodicals 


39681 


36027 


36496 


Adult Sound Recordings 


30289 


34455 


35332 


Adult Videos 


24915 


23218 


24346 


Children's Videos 


5989 


5832 


1404 


Other Adult 


543 


548 


519 


Other Children's 


8478 


7844 


8310 


Museum Pass Use 


1498 


1423 


1315 


Total 


486586 


471808 


452057 


OTHER STATISTICS 








Reference Questions 


31187 


29699 


29801 


Periodicals Owned 


421 


429 


447 


Programs 


287 


266 


281 


Program Attendance 


10471 


6023 


7914 


Reserves Placed 


10554 


10109 


9189 


Interlibrary 








Loan Requests 


2600 


2306 


2113 



* Most of year in Adult Videos 



39.0 
37. 1 
35. 2_ 
33. 3_ 
31.4 
29. 5_ 
27.6 
25. 7_ 
23.8 
21.9_ 
20.0 



Staffing (full time equivalent) 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

♦ ♦•*♦♦♦•♦#♦♦« 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 



Ql930 01990 □ 1 993 



495000 
485500 
476000_ 
466500_ 
457000_ 
447500_ 
438000_ 
428500_ 
4 19000_ 
40950O. 
400000 



CIRCULATION 




|t «•«.«. + «. + «. 

► ♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦ 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

► ♦■♦♦•*>•*■♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

► ♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦ 
>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

► ♦♦•♦♦■♦♦♦ 
►♦♦♦♦♦*♦ 




Dl989 01990 □ 1 99 1 □ 1 992 



31 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



In conjunction with the Town's 21st Century program adopted by 
the Board of Selectmen in 1992, the Andover Fire Department's 
mission statement is as follows: "To proudly protect lives and 
property by providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire 
protection and life safety services to the residents of Andover," 
To achieve this goal, the Department strives to prevent loss to 
property from fire or fire related activities through inspections, 
training, and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services; 
and, provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among 
area citizens. 

We are happy to report that this year the Fire Department 
became completely computerized and now operates through a 
computerized dispatch system. 

Calendar Years: 1989 1990 1991 1992 

Service Calls: 

Alarms of Fire 
Service Calls 
Actual Fires 
Rescues 
Misc. Alarms 
Accidental Alarms 
Mutual Aid-Fire 
False Alarms 
Ambulance Calls 
Mutual Aid- Ambulance 
Prevention Activities 

Total Service Calls: 

Licenses/Permits Issued 
Fire Alarm Boxes 

* Figures not available due to new computerization system and 
realignment of calls. 

Income jBv Fiscal Year) : 

Licenses , Permits 

Fire Alarm Boxes: $10,430 $ 27,866 $ 41,201 $ 49,930 
Ambulance Fees: $99,600 $115,590 $140,609 $170,490 

Personnel: 68 "65 64 63.5 

Facilities: Apparatus /Equipment : 

Central Station: 2 Ambulances ;1 Ladder Truck; 2 Pumpers; 

32 North Main St. 1 Boat; 4 Sedans. 

West Station: 1 Pumper;! Fire Alarm Truck; 1 Boat. 

Greenwood/Chandler Rds . 

Ballardvale Station: 1 Pumper; 1 Boat. 

Clark & Andover Sts. 



1838 


1688 


1711 


* 


649 


680 


652 


* 


* 


* 


* 


262 


* 


* 


* 


27 


* 


* 


* 


248 


641 


493 


482 


615 


40 


37 


32 


30 


63 


85 


23 


64 


1459 ■ 


1503 


1557 


1584 


164 


218 


125 


172 


883 


■ 1291 


1696 


2317 


5737 


5995 


6278 


5319 


1173 


1387 


1303 


1820 


* 


108 


115 


115 



32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The year 1992 saw the Police Department start with one less 
position from the year before. The retirement of Lt. Donald 
Mooers, and the elimination of his position, reduced the number of 
sworn personnel from 50 to 46. We also saw the resignation of 
Officer Matthew Aumais, who was selected for the Massachusetts 
State Police Academy. 

The department was plagued with injuries this year and 
operated most of the year with four (4) less men - three were out 
due to on-the-job injuries, and one on extended sick time. 
Although the department was short-handed, the remaining personnel 
picked up the slack and performed in an extraordinary manner. 

In the areas of Operations, Lieutenant John Lynch and Sergeant 
William MacKenzie designed a new color scheme for the marked 
cruisers. New mobile computer terminals were installed in the new 
marked cruisers . 

The department completed a two-year program of changing from 
the old style police revolver to the new semi-automatic handgun. 
During this time, all members were given two days of training prior, 
to the issuance of this new weapon. 

In July, the department applied for and received a $2,000 
grant from the Greater Lawrence Highway Safety Committee to promote 
seat belt safety and pedestrian safety. 

In December, the department received another grant totalling 
$14,000 from The Governor's Highway Safety Council to be used for 
drunk driving enforcement, pedestrian safety and seat belt safety. 
This grant was accomplished by the work of Operations Commander 
Phillip E. Froburg and Sergeant Brian Pattullo. 

The Detective Division investigated 435 incidents in 1992 - 
twenty-two suspects were arrested and one subject admitted to 
committing over two hundred breaks in order to support his drug 
habit. The Detective Division also investigated two parental 
kidnappings with successful results. Fingerprints were used in 
forty-six cases to identify the perpetrators. 

The Fingerprint Section printed over one hundred local 
residents on requests for job clearance or adoption papers. This 
unit issued 317 permits for either Firearms Identification cards or 
Pistol Permits. They photographed eighty-one separate incidents, 
serious accidents, accidents involving Town vehicles, accidents 
involving Town property and serious cases where photos are required 
for court evidence. 



33 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

Animal Control saw a large decrease in dog complaints during 
1992. The Animal Control Officer was busy during the year in other 
areas: 

attended three one-day seminars on rabies. 

addressed the Department of Community Services Dog Obedience 
classes on dog laws in the Town of Andover. 

investigated a dog shooting and follow-up with a court 
conviction for the crime of cruelty of animals. 

did an article with the Andover Townsman regarding his job, 
responsibilities and issues related to rabies. 

is in the process of developing a Rabies Awareness Program 
with the schools, Health Department and Andover Animal 
Hospital. 

1990 1991 1992 



Number of citations issued 




41 




54 


54 


Fines/fees collected 


$2 


,355 


$2, 


,603 


$2,433 


Dog Complaints 




871 




786 


531 


Impounded Dogs 




155 




131 


115 


Lost Dogs 




132 




94 


84 


Dogs Found 




71 




47 


52 


Impounded Cats 




32 




54 


58 


Numbers of calls answered 




2,418 


2, 


r 041 


1,935 


ANDOVER EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT 









The Director attended required meetings on Emergency 
Management and Preparedness both at the State and Federal levels. 

The State also offered courses on Hazardous Materials Spills 
and how to handle them safely and professionally. Andover 
departments involved with this responsibility sent delegates for 
training and experience. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts removed the Town of Andover 
as a primary relocation site in case of an incident at the Seabrook 
Nuclear Power Plant. The new site is Tewksbury, site of the 
Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency area headquarters. 

The Auxiliary Police continued to assist the Police Department 
in many functions such as road races, 4th of July celebration, etc. 
thus accumulating many volunteer hours. 

The Communications Section held their weekly radio checks and 
also supported the Police Department in many functions throughout 
the year. 



34 



ANDOVER POLICE DEPARTMENT 

ANNUAL SUMMARY 

1992 



MV Fatalities 



1989 



1990 



1991 



1992 



Total Incidents 



25,080 25,508 22,905 22,023 



Adult Arrests 
Juvenile Arrests 

Total Arrests 



506 


655 


530 


476 


23 


63 


19 


28 


529 


718 


549 


504 



B & E 



278 



180 



170 



175 



Larceny 
Stolen Cars 



691 



162 



611 



169 



467 



161 



587 



152 



Stolen Bicycles 



38 



56 



100 



69 



Domestic Abuse 



31 



24 



28 



MV Accidents 



1,216 1,170 1,106 1,182 



Vandalism 



368 



327 



341 



282 



Parking Violations 



11,750 11,674 9,699 10,100 



MV Citations 



4,746 4,152 3,023 ' 3,025 



Mileage 



364,737 430,545 414,764 403,983 



Gasoline (gallons used) 



51,280 46,001 49,694 44,045 



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42 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



1990 



1991 



1992 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef calves under one year 

Number of beef cows over two years 

Number of beef heifers one to two years 

Number of beef bulls 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds* 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses 

(includes work and saddle horses) 
Number of ponies 
Number of goats 
Number of sheep 
Number of swine 
Number of swine herds* 

• • • 

* One animal constitutes a herd 



27 


20 


19 








3 


33 


28 


23 


4 


23 


1 


10 


47 


36 


25 


8 





4 


3 





60 


35 


35 


1 


3 


2 





11 


2 


79 


72 


65 


30 


23 


20 


5 


13 


17 


1 


3 


6 


103 


77 


65 


1 


2 


2 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 



The Department of Community Services continues to rate the 
pulse of the community and transfuse their ideas into worthwhile 
programs. A constant effort to improve customer service by 
employing Total Quality Management techniques has paid off with 
increased enrollment and revenues. Increases are attributed to an 
excellent repertoire of community-based instructors, streamlined 
registration including Fax, VISA/Mastercard, overnight mailbox, 
increased identification with "blue book" . We feel that economic 
restraints of recent years force the community to choose public, 
less expensive programs over private programs. The quality factor 
keeps them coming back to our programs. 



Class and program revenues are as follows: 



1990 
Class participants 2,803 
Class Revenue $ 85,710 

Programs (camps, trips) $115,43 6 
Amount of Tax Support $13 6,3 39 



1991 
3,083 
$105,596 
$130,227 
$ 57,321 



1992 
3,754 
$138,397 
$131,019 
$ 53,274 



43 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 



The Department of Municipal Maintenance provides services to 
all departments requesting repair or new work to their facilities, 
grounds or vehicles. The department also provides services to the 
general public for street lighting, traffic lights, rubbish pickup, 
park and parking lot lighting, athletic fields, fencing, leaf 
composting, Christmas tree pickup, tree work, and custodial 
services for events. The department is charged with keeping 
Andover facilities, vehicles and grounds in good condition and to 
improve the facilities through an on-going capital improvement 
program. The Department of Municipal Maintenance manages the 
Spring Grove Cemetery and is actively clearing and constructing 
additional areas for burials. 

The department is required to keep abreast of required 
Federal, State and Town laws, the American Disabilities Act 
regulations, and laws concerning health safety, pesticide 
application, underground fuel tanks, radon, air quality, asbestos, 
lead paint and hazardous waste disposal. 

The Director of Municipal Maintenance Department has 
supervision of three Superintendents, the Facilities Coordinator, 
Administrative Secretary, Account Clerk, two part-time 
Receptionist/Switchboard Operators, one part-time Clerical 
Assistant and one part-time Computer Operator. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The following are some of the highlights which the Building 
Maintenance Division completed during 1992: 

West Middle School - New ceilings in the corridors and kitchen 
areas. Smoke doors, frames and hardware (17 sets) were 
installed throughout the building. The building was painted 
throughout. New student lockers were installed. Gymnasium 
floor was sanded and restriped and new bleachers were 
installed. 

Doherty Middle School - Walls were removed in some areas of 
the building and in other areas, new walls were constructed to 
make new classrooms and more classroom space available. Three 
sets of new smoke doors were installed. Paint touch-ups were 
done throughout. 

Andover High School - Folding doors were removed and permanent 
walls were constructed in two classrooms. 

West Elementary School - New ceilings were installed in the 
first grade area corridor and by the old gymnasium. Two sets 
of new outside doors were installed. 



44 



1992 




414 


24% 


1281 


76% 



Ballardvale Fire Station - Sill board was rotten and was 
replaced with a new board. The kitchen area was completely 
renovated and new stairs were installed leading to sleeping 
quarters. 

Playground equipment throughout the Town was sprayed with 
waterproof silicone to preserve wood. Installed miscellaneous 
• new equipment throughout the Town. 

Total work orders and percentage completed for the Town and 
School buildings are as follows: 

1991 

Town Buildings 147 30% 

School Buildings* 342 70% 

Total 489 100% 1695 100% 

* Percentage breakdown by school building as follows: 

Andover High School 2 5% 21% 

Bancroft School 8% 9% 

Doherty Middle School 21% 18% 

Sanborn School 2% 6% 
Shawsheen School - Early 

Childhood Center 5% 5% 

South Elementary School 6% 4% 

West Elementary School 7% 17% 

West Middle School 18% 16% 

Collins Center 2% 2% 

East Wing Office 6% 2% 

(School Administration & 
Council on Aging) 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 

The Municipal Buildings Division is responsible for the 
scheduling and renting of schools, school and town fields, 
Recreation Park, and the Old Town Hall in the Andover Town House. 

Schools 

Rentals remain constant. Approximately 650 permits were 
issued in 1992 to school/municipal personnel, scouting 
organizations/youth leagues, and private individuals. 

School/Municipal: 60% 

Scouting Organizations/Youth Leagues: 18% 
Private Individuals: 22% 



45 



School/Town Fields 

All fields continued to be rented to capacity from the 
beginning of April through mid-November. Permits were issued for 
over 2,800 uses of town/school fields to youth leagues (Little 
League, Soccer, Girls Softball, Junior Football) and adult groups. 

Youth Leagues: 93% 
Adult Groups: 7% 

Recreation Park 

In addition to the park being used for two programs sponsored 
by the Department of Community Services (Andover Men's League and 
Youth Day Camp) , permits are issued for weekend use from mid-May to 
mid-October to resident and non-resident groups. Permits are also 
issued for mid-week rentals when camp is not in session. Rentals 
remain constant. Fifty-two permits were issued in 1992. 

Residents: 54% 

Non-Residents: 4 6% 

Old Town Hall 

Rental agreements for the use of the Old Town Hall in the 
Andover Town House have been issued since February 199 to 
municipal/school groups, residents and non-residents. Eighty-three 
rental agreements were issued in 1992. 

1990 1991 1992 . 

Residents 

Non-Residents 

School/Municipal 

The goal of the Municipal Buildings Division is to continue to 
promote positive community relations with school/town departments, 
community organizations and the general public. 

PARKS AND GROUNDS DIVISION 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, 
Cemetery and Forestry) are independent and interdependent. They 
all operate under the supervision of one superintendent. They 
share certainb pieces of equipment and work together on special 
projects. As with any public agency with manpower, special 
equipment, and vehicles in its inventory, the three divisions 
perform many taks seemingly unrelated to their principal 
horticultural maintenance duties such as delivering surplus 
government food to the Senior Center, litter control, trash 
removal, recycling, flagpole maintenance, fence/gate/backstop 
repairs, drainage connections, ice control, snow removal, and 
moving extraordinarily heavy objects like the whiskey barrels used 
"as planters in the downtown area. 



46 



64% 


65% 


78% 


19% 


24% 


13% 


17% 


11% 


9% 



Parks 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields 
and 1.4 million square feet of lawn areas. Ballfields are located 
on all school grounds and other areas such as Recreation Park, 
Ballardvale Playground, upper Shawsheen, lower Shawsheen, the 
Bowling Green, and the Deyermond Field. Lawn areas are the grounds 
of all Town and School buildings, parks, playgrounds, and 
designated islands, triangles, and other parcels throughout the 
Town. Ballfields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all 
secondary school athletic events. Turf maintenance consists of 
mowing, aerating, watering, overseeding, liming, fertilizing and 
controlling weeds and insects. Pesticide operations are conducted 
by trained and licensed personel using approved pesticides and 
methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and 
shrub beds on Town property and cuts back brush encroaching upon 
ballfields and recreation areas. 

Cemetery 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by 
the Town of Andover. The cemetery contains approximately sixty 
acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 1992, there were 
83- burials and 81 grave sites were sold. $58,935 in fees were 
collected - $39,815 was turned over to the Town Treasurer and 
$19,120 was added to the principal of the Perpetual Care Fund. 
Cemetery operations and maintenance consist of burials, mowing, 
trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf 
pickup, snow removal, care of its own facilities and equipment, and 
out-of -cemetery tasks such as trash in Recreation Park, drainage 
work and construction. During 1992, the cemetery crew planted 
ornamental Pine and Beech trees purchased with funds from the 
estate of Sidney P. White. 

A three-year comparison of burials, sales, and monies 
collected is as follows: 

1990 1991 1992 

Burials 84 72 83 

Grave Sites Sold 140 . 109 81 

Total Monies Collected- $48,270 $57,425 $58,935 

Forestry 

Forestry is responsible for the maintenance of trees along the 
roadside, on school property, and other Town-owned land. During 
1992, 107 dead and dying large trees were removed. The Forestry 
Division planted 38 shade trees along the roadside. Tree varieties 
planted were: Bradford Pear, Green Ash, Armstrong Maple, White 
Pine and Honeylocust. Approximately 25% of the personnel's time 
was spent on pruning which consists of street-by-street pruning, 
problem tree pruning, storm repairs, flatclearing areas of 
undesireable vegetation, and removing obstructions at intersections 



47 



and curves thus providing better visibility. The Forestry Division 
also mowed tall weeds along the roadside throughout the Town. 

A three-year comparison of removals and planting is as 
follows: 

1990 1991 1992 

Trees Removed 116 122 107 

Trees Planted 120 37 38 

PLUMBING/HEATING/ELECTRICAL DIVISION 

The following are the major accomplishments during 1992: 

West Elementary School - Two new boilers installed, lighting 
installed in original section of the school. 

West Middle School - All new lighting installed in all 
corridors, upgrade of all toilet facilities. 

Andover High School Lovely Field - Installation of new 
underground wiring for field lighting. 

South Elementary School - New lighting installed throughout 
the school. 

Sanborn Elementary School - New boiler installed. 

Town Offices - New smoking area was created. 

Street lighting - Street and traffic lights have developed 
into a considerable time-consuming task. They require special 
equipment (bucket truck) and special training for our service 
personnel to perform this function. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

In 199.2 the division purchased five new police vehicles, a new 
ambulance for the Fire Department and also a new truck for the 
Highway Department and Tree Department. 

The following statistics indicate the gallons of gasoline and 
diesel fuel used by the Town departments : 

1990 1991 1992 

Police Dept. Gasoline 77,025 56,903.5 46,668.74 

Fire Dept. Gasoline 4,773 12,089.16* 4,456.18 

Diesel 6,151 5,988.90 

DPW Gasoline 44,207** 20,240.92 7,602.10 

Diesel 20,618.5 11,399** 10,887.7 



48 



1990 



1991 



DMM 



Gasoline 
Diesel 



Collaborative Diesel 

Council on Aging Gasoline 

Library Gasoline 

Town Manager Gasoline 



1992 

21,961.1 
2,232.9 

4,367.7 

735.8 

2,622 

554.2 



* Total includes both gasoline and diesel fuel. 
** Total includes DMM for FY-90 and FY-91. 



4 9 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

ENGINEERING 

Construction supervision was provided for the following 
projects: 

Completion of surface water drainage contract from 1989 - 
Greenwood Road, River Street and Andover Street. 

Installation of water main - Glenwood Road extension. 



Sewer construction in North Street to Webster Street 
completed. 

Gasoline tank removal at Barron's Country Store. 

Replacement of water main in High Plain Road from Serenity- 
Lane to Beacon Street and in Beacon Street from High Plain 
Road to the West Elementary School. 

Pavement recycling and paving of Greenwood Road between High 
Plain Road and Lowell Street. 

Bidding, layout and supervision of traffic light installation 
and intersection improvements at Lowell Street and Haggetts 
Pond Road. 

Fence and guard rail on Lowell Street near the Water Treatment 
Plant. 

Clark Road curb and sidewalk replacement, 8 00 feet more or 
less at. the Dascomb Road end. 

Bids Were received for the installation of traffic lights on 
Dascomb Road at Frontage Road. Construction to take place in 
the spring. 

A great deal of time was spent this year on the following 
projects: 

York Street improvements under a CDAG grant. 

Rehabilitation plans by consultants for the Central Street and 
Stevens Street bridges over the Shawsheen River. 

River Road improvements - Route 93 to the Lawrence line. 

Harding Street railroad bridge replacement by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works. 



50 



Preliminary and/or definitive plans for 12 subdivisions of 
land with a total of 255 lots were reviewed for the Planning Board 
to determine conformance with its rules and regulations and to 
ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. The necessary 
performance bond amounts were figured where needed and field 
inspections of subdivisions under construction were carried out. 
Legal descriptions for roadway layouts and easements were checked 
before they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where 
necessary for the projects outlined above and for other proposed 
projects. Federal and State government agencies were consulted on 
engineering matters, principally concerning Chapter 9 
construction, sewer main extensions and State Highway projects. 

Many Town residents and others were assisted in obtaining 
information concerning existing utilities, street layouts, 
industrial and residential sites and other general information. 
The Engineering Division's records were maintained and updated and 
other Town Departments were aided in obtaining information. The 
Engineering Division updates the Town's Assessors maps and prints 
the necessary copies for the Town departments. Street opening 
permits for the installation and repair of underground utilities 
were issued through this division and the necessary inspections 
were carried out. 

HIGHWAY 

Six streets were resurfaced with bituminous concrete for a 
total of 2.2 miles. 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers were kept busy in 
continuous cleaning of all streets after winter sanding. Both 
sweepers begin each morning at 5:00 A.M. The Highway Division 
assists the Engineering Division in its inspection of the 
conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. 
The Highway Division also provides men and equipment for all other 
divisions when needed. 

During 1992, 1,288 catchbasins and seven storm drains were 
cleaned and kept free of all debris. All Town brooks were also 
cleaned and maintained. Forty-eight catchbasins and two storm 
drains were repaired because of deterioration and damage caused by 
frost and icy conditions during the winter season. The Highway 
Division,, with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of 
the Public Works Department and the Department of Municipal 
Maintenance, is also responsible for snow removal .and ice control, 
including flood control for all Town roads. 



51 



.0,388 


10,510 


2,186 


2,168 


705 


507 


844 


326 



SOLID WASTE 

The Town, under contract, collected 11,233 tons of residential 
refuse. Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste 
Committee (NESWC) , has its refuse transported and processed at the 
Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover, where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division 
oversees the mandatory curbs ide recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines and glass along with the voluntary drop-off 
program collecting #1 & #2 plastics, aluminum materials, and metal 
containers. In 1992, the curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines and glass recycled 1,191 tons of material. 
The Town also maintains a leaf and grass clippings compost site on 
High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the compost material being 
available to Town residents. 

FY92 FY91 

Tons of residential refuse collected 
Tons of newspapers/magazines recycled 
Tons of glass recycled 
Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 

SEWER 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and 
maintenance_of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path, West Elementary School, Shawsheen 
Village, and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 66 miles of sanitary sewers and 
4,634 connections. 

In 1992, the Sewer Division freed 40 blockages in sewer mains, 
rodded 23 mains, repaired 1, and answered 27 private sewer 
problems. The Shawsheen Village Pumping Station discharges by 
means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Merrimack 
River. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village Pumping 
Station is collected and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary 
District's Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

FY92 FY91 

Sewer main blocks cleared 3 6 39 

Sewer main rotted - maintenance 13 16 

Sewer mains repaired 1 

Sewer services cleared 34 40 



52 



WATER 

The Water Division is responsible for the meter reading, 
supply, treatment and distribution of drinking water to the Town of 
Andover. The major components of the water system are as follows: 

Supply — Haggetts Pond, Fish Brook, Merrimack River, Abbot 
Well; Treatment — Water Treatment Plant; Chlorination Facilities 
— Fish Brook; Pumping Stations — Water Treatment Plant, Fish 
Brook, Bancroft Reservoir, Prospect Hill and Wood Hill. The Water 
Treatment Plant has recently undergone an expansion to increase 
capacity from 12 MGD to 24 MGD and has added an Ozone Treatment 
facility which came on line in January 1992. 

Distribution Mains — 185 miles and 8,912 connections. 

FY92 FY91 

Hydrants Repaired 
Hydrants Replaced 
Hydrants Flushed 
Water Main Breaks Repaired 
House Service Leaks Repaired 
House Services Renewed 
Water Main Taps 
New Water Meters Installed 
Old Water Meters Replaced 
Water Meters Repaired 
Water Shut/Of fs/Turn Ons 
Gate Boxes Adjusted 
Gallons of Water pumped to 

the system (in millions) 1,789 1,865 
Average daily gallons 

(in million gallons) 4.902 5.112 

Maximum day (in million gallons) 10.85 10.92 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment 
Facility continued to provide service to residential, commercial 
and industrial users in 1992. Since its initial operation in April 
1977, the facility has treated 139 billion gallons of wastewater 
that was previously discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack 
River. 

The plant is currently staffed by 73 people. The operation is 
continuous 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. The District 
Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 

FY9 2 FY91 

Andover 1 s daily average flow to the 

Sanitary District (in millions of gallons) 3.308 3.440 



43 


39 


8 


6 


29 


31 


14 


18 


14 


13 


6 


11 


1 


2 


42 


55 


85 


179 


4 


5 


189 


170 


30 


35 



53 



ANDOVER RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

The Andover Recycling Committee met monthly when needed during 
1992. Curbside collection of paper and glass was in its second 
full year. Dave White was paid a fee to collect plastic (#1 and 
#2) and aluminum cans on the third Saturday of each month. Tonnage 
was 2.3 tons per month, an increase from more than one ton per 
month in 1991. Metal cans were collected starting in December. 
Carol Rougvie continued to organize our volunteers to assist Dave 
White's crew. We had two or three volunteers per shift from 9:00 
A.M. to 11:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 

Jinny Cole continued to write articles for the Andover 
Townsman . Joyce Ringleb continued to work with groups of school 
children on recycling projects and related field trips. 

The button battery collection program, supervised by Hanne 
Castle, begun in October 1991 officially ended in October 1992. 
Button batteries were collected at specific locations throughout 
Andover by our volunteers. They were then sorted, counted and 
shipped to a facility in New York. Dana Duxbury and Associates has 
compiled the results of this one-year program. After consulting 
with the Town Manager, it was agreed to continue this program, 
though pickups will be random because sorting and counting will not 
be necessary. 

Also, an agreement was arranged with Waste Management, Inc. , 
Andover' s curbside recycling contractor, to collect button 
batteries and rechargeable batteries (placed in a zip-lock plastic 
bag) along with the curbside collection program. This pilot 
program started in January 199 3 after planning for six months with 
Dana Duxbury. Information regarding all recycling was included in 
the Calendar with a zip-lock bag and was mailed to all residents in 
late December. Recycling committee members assisted in the 
preparation of this mailing. 

The committee's goals for the future remain the same as stated 
in our report for 1991: 1) to encourage the- Town and schools to 
buy paper products made of recycled paper; and 2) to monitor, 
assist, and encourage comprehensive recycling in Andover. 



54 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

The year 1992 saw a significant reduction in social activity 
by the senior population due in large part to poor economic 
conditions. In order to reverse the trend, the Council on Aging 
has had to offset the senior expenses through contributions and 
other sources where available. 

The latter part of the year saw the resignation of Elizabeth 
Leed, Outreach Coordinator, and Mary Byrne-Potvin, Director. The 
Council on Aging is severely handicapped by the loss of personnel. 
The present staff has assumed the duties at great expense to morale 
and physical endurance. Staffing to fill the voids is awaiting the 
appointment of a new Director. 

A concerted effort is underway by the existing staff to 
improve involvement by seniors and to revise programs that will 
make the Senior Center a more user friendly environment. 

1990 1991 1992 

Elderly Social Day Care 

Total Participation 48 59 • 61 

Total Days Used 3,824 4,024 4,945 

Instructional Classes 

Total Classes 235 255 297 

Total Participation 460 490 577 

Lectures and Seminars 

Total Number 15 '18 2 3 

Total Attendance 375 450 575 

Lunch Program 

Meals-On-Wheels 8,995 8,440 8,789 

Walk-Ins 7,003 6,164 5,128 

Day Care 3,333 3,760 4,095 

Social Events 

Number of Parties 10 7 6 

Total Attendance ' 1,077 628 404 

Senior Prom Attendance 135 217 231 

Binao (Weekly) 

Total Games 48 48 4 8 

Total Attendance 3,600 3,800 4,200 

Elderly Health Clinic 703 630 718 

Eve Screening (2/vr. 1 ) 50 60 65 

Hearing Screening fl/mo.) — — 120 



55 



1990 1991 1992 

Skin Cancer Screening . — — 3 

Outreach Services 
Elder Services of the 
Merrimack Valley: 

Unduplicated Clients 258 275 249 

Proportionate Cost of 

Services $195,787 $181,946 $202,816 

Family Service Assoc. 

of Lawrence: 
Unduplicated Clients 62 60 70 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The Annual Report for Fiscal year 1992, covering the period 
from July 1, 1991 through June 30, 1992, was accepted and approved 
at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District Committee held on 
November 24, 1992. The report is prepared each year in conformity 
with the terms of the Agreement ot Establish a Regional School 
District. Participating communities in the district are the City 
of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 



1990-91 


1991-92 


1,53 


1,448 


39 


26 


83% 


76% 



Enrollment 

Andover students 

Placement of graduates/employment 

The business firms with Cooperative Work Agreements with the 
school numbered 1,831 - an increase of thirty-three companies 
within one year. 

The following courses were offered during the 1991-92 school 
year: 

Allied Health Technician Autobody 

Automotive Carpentry 

Construction & Building/Painting Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts Data Processing 

Distributive Education Electrical 

Electronics Food Tech Mgmt/Clothing 

Graphic Communications Technology Heavy Equipment 

Industrial Electronics CAD/Machine Technology 

Major Appliance/Air Conditioning/ Metal Fabrication 

Refrigeration 

Plumbing & Pipef itting Small. Engine Repair 



56 



FY92 ESTIMATED and ACTUAL REVENUES 



Fiscal Year 1992 (July 1, 1991 - June 30, 1992) 



July, 1992 



ESTIMATED 



VARIANCE 



ACTUAL 



PUPIL TRANSPORTATION 

SCHOOL PROGRAM TRANSPORTATION 

REGIONAL SCHOOL AID 

SCHOOL AID - CHAPTER 70 

OTHER FUNDS 

ANDOVER 

LAWRENCE 



$387,449.00 

1,785,663.00 

3,725,901.00 

415,650.00 

105,926.00 

3,001,344.00 



($35,122.00) 
11,800.00 



$352,327.00 
11,800.00 

1,785,663.00 

3,725,901.00 
415,650.00 
105,926.00 

3,001,344.00 



METHUEN 


739,484.00 




739,484.00 


NO. ANDOVER 


135,393.00 
$10,296,810.00 


050 

($23,321.50) 


135,393.50 
$10,273,488.50 






J 




FY92 BUDGETED AND EXPENDEE C 




1000 GENERAL 






i BUDGETED 


VARIANCE 


EXPENDED 


$499,017.00 


$37,837.44 


$461,179.56 


2000 INSTRUCTION 


5,561,965.00 


98,809.64 


5,463,155.36 


3000 AUXILIARY AGENCIES 


515,603.00 


33,921.60 


481,681.40 


3350 TRANSPORTATION 


508,777.00 


61,142.58 


447,634.42 


4100 PLANT OPERATION 


934,232.00 


6,933.59 


927,298.41 


4200 PLANT MAINTENANCE 


567,811.00 


96, 147.76 


471,663.24 


5000 SPECIAL CHARGES 


1,596,405.00 


19,664.02 


1,576,740.98 


7000 OUTLAY 


113,000.00 


(102,276.22) 


215,276.22 


9000 OUTSIDE SERVICES 


' 


(25,083.75) 


25,083.75 


$10,296,810.00 


$227,096.66 


$10,069,713.34 



57 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of the 
State Building 780 CMR of the Acts of 1972 and Zoning Act, 
Massachusetts General Laws 40A. The Building Division issues 
permits for all types of construction including, but not limited 
to, school buildings (both public and private) , institutional 
buildings (nursing homes) , business, commercial and industrial 
buildings, dormitories, multi-family as well as single family 
dwellings, pools, chimneys, signs and additions and alterations to 
all structures. Building officials also perform periodic 
inspections for those buildings which are required to obtain 
Certificates of Inspection under State Building Code, Table 108. 

Building officials are employed to administer the building 
code and to enforce the zoning bylaws which are adopted by both 
state and local governments. The scope of these codes encompasses 
a broad range of professional and trade subject areas such as 
architecture, engineering, fire safety, law, electrical, carpentry, 
plumbing and gas. Building officials must be familiar with and 
informed to provide the public with information and guidance on all 
building and code related matters. 

Type Est. Values Fees 

141 Single Family Dwellings $21,763,100 $166,437 
(including foundations) 

2 New Commercial Construction 26,265,000 133,425 

624 Additions and Alternations to 

all Types of Buildings 22,997,968 147,030 

18 Public Buildings/Schools 1,004,372 1,968 

425 Pools, Chimney, Raze, Signs 718,816 12,543 

Certificates of Inspection 820 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 2 , 245 

TOTAL $72,749,256 $464,468 

1990 1991 1992 

Number of Permits* 2,644 2,772 3,024 

Est. Construction Values* $40,299,627 $37,974,355 $72,749,256 
Fees* $ 346,867 $ 355,939 $ 548,686 

* Includes Building, Electrical, Plumbing and Gas Permits 



58 



ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the 
practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising 
from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for receiving and granting permits and scheduling 
inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, 
commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans for new 
buildings, assisting the Fire Department in inspections of fires 
due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits are issued 
for repairs due to fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, 
conducting and certifying inspections of schools, public buildings, 
day- care centers and nursing homes in conjunction with the building 
officials are part of the duties of the Electrical Inspector. 
Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the 
cooperation of Massachusetts Electric Company and corrected without 
incident. 



1991 



1992 



Permits issued 
Fees collected 



793 
$35,463.50 



885 
$43,239.00 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTIONS 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas 
installations is controlled by a State Uniform Plumbing and Gas 
Code formulated by the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas 
Fitters under authority of Chapter 142 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

This office completes the inspection for permitting gas, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Following the 
initial inspection, additional inspections are completed during 
construction to ensure compliance with State codes. A final 
inspection is conducted for the same purpose as well as to sign off 
on a Certificate of Occupancy. Complaints and violations must also 
be investigated and corrected or reported to the proper 
authorities. 



1991 



1992 



Plumbing Permits issued 
Fees collected 
Gas Permits issued 
Fees collected 



454 
$29,166 

376 
$10,821 



527 
$29,343 

402 
$11,636 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

During 1992, the Conservation Commission issued nearly double 
the number of permits under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection 
Act as the preceding year. As required by law, an advertised 
Public Hearing is conducted for each permit issued. These projects 
include commercial/industrial, residential subdivisions, single lot 
development and municipal and State projects. 

The Conservation Commission maintains the on-going delineation 
of wetland resources depicted on the 183 Andover Wetland Maps which 
are directly referenced in various Town By-Laws and regulations, 
including the Zoning By-Law, the Watershed Protection Overlay 
District, and Rules and Regulations for Use of Subsurface Sewage 
Disposal Systems. Approximately sixteen hundred acres of Town- 
owned land are under the control and custody of the Conservation 
Commission which prepared and periodically revises Andover* s Open 
Space and Outdoor Recreation Plan. No funds are presently 
available for the purpose of new open space. The Commission 
administers a number of statutory Conservation Restrictions and 
Conservation Easements over privately owned property. 

The Conservation staff attends interdepartmental reviews of 
major projects, and interacts with the other Town land-use 
regulatory agencies, including the Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board, Board of Health, Building officials and their 
respective staff members and provides technical and administrative 
support to the seven-member volunteer Commission. 

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 

Conservation Commission Meetings 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Orders of Condition Issued 

Amended Orders of Condition Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications Issued 

Wetland Map Boundary Amendments 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Conservation Restrictions Established 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Professional Staff 



24 


24 


22 


23 


24 


181 


147 


90 


95 ' 


185 


28 


18 


22 


18 


20 


42 


25 


8 


2 


9 


41 


59 


48 


47 


59 


86 


77 


60 


46 


102 




17 


3 


18 


22 


39 


19 


8 


24 


14 






' 2 


3. 


4 


15 


19 


10 


8 


10 


7.3 


57.5 


58.3 


16.3 


36.2- 


3 














$825 


$4,637 


$12,907 


$5,355 


$5,552 


2 


2 

(until 8/89) 


1 


1 


1 



Expenditures from Conservation Fund . 

(bv Fiscal Year) $160,275 $529,507 $285,000 $922 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The Andover Board of Health is the Town's health policy and 
decision-making board. Administrative staff includes the Director 
of Public Health, two Sanitary Code Inspectors/Health officers and 
two part-time Public Health nurses. The following are highlights 
of the Board of Health activities in 1992: 

received a $4,000 grant from the Andover Home for the Aged for 
a data gathering and needs assessment project to evaluate 
health service provisions to senior citizens. This project 
will be a valuable health planning took for the allocation of 
health services for the 1990' s. 

implemented a "Drug-Free Workplace Prevention and Education 
. Program" which trained more than 150 Town employees, promoted 
the Town Offices as a smoke-free workplace and established an 
AIDS Advisory Committee with the School Department Health 
Education staff to examine AIDS-related issues in the 
workplace. 

the Public Health nursing staff immunized a record number of 
1,200 senior citizens against influenza in its annual flu 
clinic in October. 

local and environmental concerns included air quality in the 
Ballardvale area for industrially-generated pollutants, 
mitigation of noise pollution from a local 
brick/concrete/bituminous recycling facility, and public 
education awareness campaign for new lead and copper standards 
and household drinking water. 

ACTIVITIES REPORT 



1990 



1991 



1992 



Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Restaurant Inspections 
Complaints & Investigations 
Administrative Hearings 
Court Actions 
Fees collected 



13 


14 


12 


165 


67 


182 


261 


296 


304 


337 


212 


246 


8 


14 


5 


4 


3 


8 



$47,372 $45,451 $72,602 



Communicable disease prevention, detention, containment and 
treatment are important public health nursing objectives. The 
increase of tuberculosis nationwide has exhibited itself in 
Andover. Three Andover industries each reported a case of active 
tuberculosis in an employee which required extensive testing and 
follow-up of the exposed employee. The Public Health Nurses went 
to two Andover plants and assisted with Mantoux testing and follow- 
up of employees. 

The Andover Health Department receives vaccines from the 



61 



Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Northeast Health 
District Immunization Office and distributes them free of charge to 
Andover physicians, walk-in centers and schools. The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts has a current Immunization Action Plan to meet the 
national goal of having 90% of the children completely immunized by 
their second birthday. Andover will participate in this statewide 
effort. 



CLINIC REPORT 



1990 1991 1992 



Outreach Clinics 
Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 
Attendance 

Office Visits 

Home Visits 

Influenza Immunization Clinic 

Attendance 992 1,140 1,088 



26 


33 


35 


347 


457 


455 


50 


44 


51 


793 


652 


755 


361 


170 


253 


8 


19 


6 



Cholesterol Screening Clinics 


10 


10 


10 


Attendance 


181 


186 


153 


Over 60 years of age 


100 


124 


83 


COMMUNICABLE 


DISEASES 








1990 


1991 


1992 


Chicken Pox 


133 


198 


167 


Animal Bites 


24 


18 


19 


Campylobacter 


11 





8 


Salmonella 


13 


9 


6 


Giardia 


6 


10 


3 



62 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The Planning Division accomplished many major objectives 
during 1992, among them the adoption of the Master Plan, a Housing 
Report, new Rules Governing Special Permits, and policies regarding 
pedestrian walkways. New parking regulations were also adopted 
which will enhance opportunities for new and expanding downtown 
businesses. It is significant to note that during a year of 
economic uncertainty, the Planning Board approved more than double 
the number of special permits compared to the previous two years, 
creating more than one-half million square feet of new commercial 
and industrial space in Andover, which in turn will generate new 
revenues and new jobs. 

Significant progress was made on important highway improvement 
projects such as the $6,000,000 River Road corridor work. During 
1992, the Planning Division concentrated on efforts to stabilize 
our local economy and stimulate hew growth by working on a regional 
level with public and private sector leaders from our neighboring 
communities of North Andover, Lawrence and Methuen as well as with 
our own downtown Andover businesses. Those efforts have already 
begun to show benefits. 

The Planning Division has always taken a great deal of pride 
in providing a multi-faceted and high level of service to Andover 
that cannot be found in other communities. This is done by 
aggressively pursuing new economic opportunities and taking a 
hands-on approach to problem solving. The division's mission is to 
maintain that level of service in 1993. 



1988 



1989 



1990 



1991 



1992 



Planning Board Meetings 


22 


23 


23 


23 


25 


Approved Definitive Subdivision Plans 


3 


8 


6 


3 


7 


Approved Preliminary Subdivision Plans 


3 


4 


3 


1 


3 


Approved ANR Plans* 


45 


37 


37 


27 


38 


Site Plan Reviews 


17 


8 


9 


1 


4 


Special Permits Issued 


1 


1 


6 


6 


13 


Subdivision Performance Guarantees 


$514,484 


$264,940 


$287,045 


$288,410 


$426,940 


Warrant Articles Reported 


38 


53 


49 


24 


22 


Street Acceptances 


3 


12 


11 


4 


8 



Revenues Generated 



$25,887 $41,585 $12,346 $53,828 $34,514 



♦Subdivision plans not requiring formal Planning Board approval 



fi^s 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function 
under the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Chapter 40A and 4 OB and the Town By-laws. The Board meets on the 
first Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library, Memorial 
Hall, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members 
are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public 
hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the 
following areas: 

For a variance from the requirements of the By-laws. 

For a special permit under the By-laws. 

By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building 

Inspector or other administrative officer. 

For permission to construct low or moderate income 

housing within the Town of Andover (Comprehensive 

Permit) . 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent 
plans and sketches requested, legal advertisements are published 
and abutters are notified as required by law. The public hearings 
are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of 
Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearings, the members 
of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each property in question 
and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter, open to the public, at 
which time the Board discusses the petitions which have been heard. 
Based on their views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a 
decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town Clerk. 



1990 1991 1992 



Regular Monthly Meetings 
Deliberation Meetings 
Petitions Heard 
Petitions Granted 
Petitions Withdrawn 



12 


12 


12 


18 


19 


15 


54 


45 


77 


39 


36 


69 


4 


7 


9 



TOWN COUNSEL 

During 1992, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before 
State Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were 
researched and rendered to Town officials. Town Counsel rendered 
in excess of seventy informal opinions and had conferences with the 
Town Manager and other Town officials on almost a daily basis. 
Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all 
Town Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts 
were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, releases and 
agreements were drafted and recorded. 



64 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1948. 
The regular meetings of the Board of Directors are held on the 
second Thursday of every month at the main office, on the second 
floor of the recreation hall at Stowe Court. 

At the Annual Meeting held on June 25, 1992, the following 
officers were elected: 

Mary Jane Powell - Chairperson 

Ronald Hajj - Vice Chairman 

Eileen Connolly - Treasurer 

John Hess - Asst. Treasurer 

The Governor's appointee to the Board of Directors is Hartley 
Burnham . 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 218 units of state-aided 
elderly housing, 56 units of state-aided family housing, 31 units 
under the Mass. Rental Voucher Program (formerly the Chapter 7 07 
Program) and 8 units of handicapped housing (Chapter 689) . In 
addition, the Authority administers 59 Section 8 Certificates and 
68 Section 8 Vouchers, which are federally funded through the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

There were several major accomplishments during 1992. The 
Housing Authority completed a three-phase modernization program in 
our elderly complexes and our family housing units. The Housing 
Authority was funded by HUD for the Family Self-sufficiency 
Program, a new initiative which will combine housing assistance 
with other supportive services which will allow participants to 
attain self-sufficiency within a five-year period. A major change 
in our elderly housing program was a waiver we obtained which 
allowed us to increase the asset limit for eligibility from $15,000 
to $45,864 for one person .and $55,008 for two people. 

The following represents a comparison of statistical data for 
the past three years: 

STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS: 

1990 1991 1992 

Income Limits: 



1 person. 


19,488 


19,488 


21,140 


2 people 


22,272 


22,272 


24,260 


3 people 


25,056 


25,056 


27,180 


4 people 


27,840 


27,840 


30,200 


5 people 


29,580 


29,580 


32,088 


6 people 


31,320 


31,320 


33,975 


7 people 


33,060 


33,060 


35,750 


8 people 


34,800 


34-, 800 


37,750 



65 



STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS : 





1990 


1991 


1992 


Vacancies: Elderly 


26 


28 


45 


Family 


13 


10 


11 


Average Rent: Elderly 


140.00 


169.00 


204.00 


Family 


291.00 


309.00 


350.00 


FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: 


Section 8 


Rental Assistance 




Income Limits: 1 person 


15,250 


16,500 


16,800 


2 people 


17,400 


18,900 


19,200 


3 people 


19,550 


21,250 


21,600 


4 people 


21,750 


23,600 


24,000 


5 people 


23,500 


25,550 


25,900 


6 people 


25,250 


27,400 


27,850 


7 people 


26,960 


29,250 


29,750 


8 people 


28,700 


31,150 


31,700 



ANDOVER HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Two major challenges dominated the Commission's activities 
during 199 2. 

At the request of the Town Manager, the Commission is working 
as a catalyst to stimulate the development of programs to celebrate 
Andover's 350th Anniversary. The Commission held three joint 
meetings with Andover civic groups and with representatives of 
North Andover and Lawrence, communities originally part of Andover. 
These groups have already begun to develop long-range programs and 
are eager to participate with Andover in several 1996 programs. 
Several worthwhile suggestions for appropriate programs were 
recorded for use by whatever committee the Town Manager and Board 
of Selectmen appoint for that purpose. The Commission has drafted 
an article for Town Meeting requesting $20,000 to assure the best 
possible celebration. Norma Gammon's experience with Andover's 
previous celebrations is most helpful. 

Another major challenge involved the Commission's action to 
begin the necessary legal steps to establish Ballardvale as 
Andover's first historic district. Andover is the only Greater 
Lawrence community without such a district. In November, the Town 
Manager appointed a seven-member study committee with three 
alternates (as prescribed in Mass. General Laws Chapter 40C) for 
the purpose of developing a proposal for Town Meeting by 1994. The 
study committee has met three times to organize itself and plan its 
investigations. Timothy Barash is serving as Chairman, Jane 



66 



Griswold as Secretary and other committee members, all with 
Ballardvale connections, are: Richard Moody, John Dugger, Ruth 
Sharpe, Robert Benedict, Roy Umanzio, Bernice Haggerty, Charles 
Murnane, Jr. and Charles Cronin. The committee recognizes that a 
major task is to garner public input and support for whatever 
proposal they develop. Substantial support has been received from 
Mr. Verkennis of the Massachusetts Historical Commission and Town 
Counsel Thomas J. Urbelis. 

The Commission has also been involved in several matters 
involving preservation of historically significant structures in 
the downtown area. These included the Barnard Building, the 
Musgrove Building, Elm Square and 75 Essex Street. In the 
demolition ordinance area, appropriate action was taken on the 
School Street property and two houses on Center Street in 
Ballardvale. One of these cases involved a bank foreclosure in 
which a decrepit garage was demolished without a permit. As a 
result, the' presidents of area banks received written notices 
regarding the demolition ordinance to assure future compliance. 

Restrictive covenants on the vacant United States Post Office 
were approved by the Massachusetts Historical Commission and 
Andover ' s Commission is taking final steps to assure the building's 
listing on the National Register of Historic Places. 

The Commission is heartened by Phillips Academy's decision to 
arrange for the conversion of Draper Hall to an apartment house in 
the near future. 

Joint programs with the Andover Historical Society continued 
in the areas of preservation awards and house markers. The Annual 
Award Ceremony at the Memorial Hall Library's Auditorium and 
resulting newspaper publicity helps to boost public awareness of 
the need for preservation. 

The Commission is concerned with the dumping of granite blocks 
and tree stumps in the historic railroad bed of Spring Grove 
Cemetery. The blocks have been removed and hopefully the stumps 
will be also. In this connection, the Andover Rail Committee has 
donated $43 0.00 to the Andover Historical Society for the purpose 
of restoring the area to its former beauty. 

Commission members were saddened by the untimely death of 
member Joel Claydon. New members added in 1992 include John 
Dugger, Stephen Kearn and Frank Byrnne. Karen Herman's superb job 
as Secretary and her leadership role on the 350th celebration 
activity is much appreciated as is Ellen Zipeto's coordinating role 
as a member of the Design Advisory Group. 



67 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Michael J. Connolly, Secretary 

SS. Essex 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Primaries to vote in Precincts 1, 2, 3 y 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, sinqle 
pollinq place to be located at: 

DUNN GYMNASIUM, ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL 
SHAWSHEEN ROAD, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

on TUESDAY, THE 10TH of MARCH 1992 

7:00 a.m. TO 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of 
candidates of political parties for the following office: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE (one man and one woman) 
for each Political Party for the SECOND ESSEX and MIDDLESEX 
DISTRICT. 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee 

Members of the Republican Town Committee 

Members of the Independent Voters Party Town Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of February, 1992 

Gerald H. Silverman 
Charles H. Wesson 
James M. Barenboim 
William T. Downs 
Larry L. Larsen 



Selectmen of Andover 



A true copy 
ATTEST 

Kenneth E. Arsenault Date: February 25, 1992 

Constable 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purpose stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of same on the 
Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted. Said 
warrants have been seven days. 

Kenneth E. Arsenault 
Constable 



68 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES, MARCH 10, 1992 



At a meeting of the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover qualified to 
vote in Primaries, convened at the designated single polling place 
in Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, and Eight on 
March 10th, 1992 at 7:00 AM agreeably to the requirements of the 
foregoing warrant, they did bring their votes as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

RALPH NADER 

LYNDON H. LAROUCHE 

JERRY BROWN 

TOM HARKIN 

LARRY AGRAN 

PAUL TSONGAS 

EUGENE MCCARTHY 

BILL CLINTON 

ROBERT KERREY 

NO PREFERENCE 



211 

1 

703 

10 

3 

3471 

9 

267 

18 

40 



WRITE - INS 

MARIO CUOMO 
BLANKS 
TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTES CAST 



11 

17 

4761 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

DAVID J. BAIN, JR. 643 

DAVID M. O'BRIEN 1862 

DENNIS J. SHANK 591 

BLANKS 1665 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTES CAST 47 61 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

MARY JANE POWELL . 2961 

BLANKS 1800 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTES CAST 47 61 



69 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES. MARCH 10. 1992 
DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 

JAMES DOHERTY 2893 

ELIZABETH J. JANKAUSKAS 2416 

RAYMOND E. LAROCHELLE 2248 

GALE ROSS 2219 

JOHN P. HESS 2317 

MICHEL A. FRISHMAN 2567 

MICHAEL F. MULLALEY 2173 

THERESA G. MURPHY 2373 

DIANE K. HAYNES 2259 

DOROTHY M. WINN 2533 

LINDA G. BLOH 2253 

DIANA S. LAROCHELLE 2 319 

JOHN D. O'BRIEN, JR. 2379 

JOHN J. NOLAN 2174 

MARK E. COURTNEY 2200 

KAREN GRASSO COURTNEY 2434 

DAVID S. BARKER 214 9 

RONALD C. HAJJ 23 4 9 

MARY JANE POWELL 24 36 

ROBERT A. LAROCHELLE 2224 

JAMES E. FOX 2288 

ELLEN T. MURPHY 2292 

NORMA L. VILLARREAL 2214 

PAUL H. STOLBERG 2157 

MICHAEL L. ZIMMER 2196 

GERALD H. SILVERMAN 2723 

SUSAN C. TUCKER 33 26 

JOHN D. O'BRIEN 2272 

ROSALIE J. BIALY 2164 

MARY ANN MARUSICH-SMITH 2191 

LAWRENCE B. MORSE 2124 

PETER G. MCCARTHY 2202 

JAMES CUTICCHIA 218 4 

MARY F. MIDDLETON 2 2 64 

SANDRA PORTER 2 318 

BLANKS 84805 

TOTAL DEMOCRATIC VOTE 47 61 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES, MARCH 10 . 1992 
REPUBLICAN PARTY 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

PATRICK J. BUCHANAN 550 

DAVID DUKE 25 

GEORGE BUSH 1577 

NO PREFERENCE ' 92 

.WRITE - INS 

PAUL TSONGAS 12 

RALPH NADER 2 - 

BILL CLINTON . 1 

MARIO CUOMO 1 

JERRY BROWN 1 

BLANKS 19 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTES CAST 2280 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

WILLIAM E. MELAHN 1529 

BLANKS 751 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTES CAST 2280 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

NANCY R. CAVERLY 1419 

ELEANOR B. FULGIONE 14 6 

OLGA-S. SYMES 184 

BLANKS 531 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTES CAST 2280 

REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 

ALLISON H. BAILEY 12 2 6 

HARTLEY M. BURNHAM 1198 

NANCY R. CAVERLY 13 3 6 

DONAL T. COLEMAN 1217 

GARY M. COON 1654 

SUSAN L. COSTELLO 12 4 9 

ELIZABETH M. CRONIN 1323 

KIMBERLY CRONIN 1295 

LEO J. CRONIN - 1259 

PAUL W. CRONIN 1426 

JOSEPH W. DADIEGO 1200 

CHARLES. F. DALTON, JR. 71 1376 



REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE (CONT.) 

JOANNE DONNELLY 1206 

JAMES L. EDHOLM 1218 

KATHLEEN D. EDHOLM 1226 

FREDERICK FLATHER, III 1255 

JOHN PATRICK HARRIS 1252 

PATRICIA M. HARRIS 1250 

ROBERT MANNING 1316 

MARIA MARASCO 1230 

PATRICK V. MARASCO - 1205 

WILLIAM E MELAHN 1339 

JOHN F. MOFFITT 1256 

SUSAN POORE 152 3 

BARBARA R. RANCOURT 1210 

JOHN A. SIMKO 1276 

ANTOINETTE THIRAS 1227 

SHIRLEY Z. THOMAS . 1200 

GRETCHEN H. WESCOTT 1262 

BOB WESCOTT 13 41 

JOHN G. WRAGG 1228 

CHRISTINE HOLMES 1291 
WRITE - INS 

RICHARD GOMES 1 

MARY CLARK WEBSTER 4 

BLANKS 38725 

TOTAL REPUBLICAN VOTE 2280 



72 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES, MARCH 10. 1992 
INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY 

ROBERT J. SMITH 1 

DARCY G. RICHARDSON 

ERIK THOMPSON 

HOWARD PHILLIPS 

EARL F. DODGE 

J. QUINN BRISBEN 

MICHAEL S. LEVINSON 

BO GRITZ 

NO PREFERENCE 4 

WRITE - INS 

RALPH NADER 1 



BLANKS 

TOTAL INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY VOTES CAST 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDDLESEX 

BLANKS 

TOTAL INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY VOTES CAST 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN - SECOND ESSEX & MIDLESEX 

BLANKS 

TOTAL INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY VOTES CAST 



INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY TOWN COMMITTEE 
BLANKS 60 

TOTAL INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY VOTE 6 



73 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 23. 1992 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 2, 1992 the 
Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Elections and 
Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. 
All eight precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, 
Seven, Eight, are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover High 
School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-THIRD DAY OF MARCH, 1992 

at eight o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the 
following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other 
public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Kenneth E. Arsenault 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. 
The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The 
polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock 
P.M. 

The total number of ballots cast was 2,455, viz: 

Prec. 1 -301 Prec. 2 -325 Prec. 3 -338 Prec. 4 -329 
Prec. 5 -274 Prec. 6 -300 Prec. 7 -359 Prec. 8 -229 

12345673 MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 



223 215 229 203 169 .197 237 148 James D. Doherty 1621 

65 96 95 114 88 82 92 70 John Doyle 702 

13 14 14 12 17 21 30 11 Blanks 132 

SELECTMEN - 

TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

241 223 254 236 186 226 243 171 Gerald H. Silverman 1780 

230 226 245 221 181 196 233 155 Charles H. Wesson 1687 

Jr. 

1 Myrna Silverman 1 

1 Jonathan Jenkins 1 

1 1 Christine Holmes 2 

1 Lawrence Picard 1 

131 201 177 200 181 178 239 131 Blanks 1438 



74 



118 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 23, 1992 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 
TWO FOR THREE YEARS 



88 58 76 59 61 56 72 33 Richard L. Hubbell 503 

150 180 179 201 184 209 253 148 William J. Huston 1504 

Jr. 
92 123 112 120 109 88 123 83 Larry M. Lewis 850 

208 198 227 218 132 182 182 141 Mary Kelvie Lyman 1488 

1 Perry Karfunkel 1 

64 91 82 60 62 65 87 53 Blanks 564 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said 
meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Chapter 39, Section 20 
of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 13, 1992, at 7:00 P.M., 
at the J. Everett Collins Center for the Performing Arts, Shawsheen 
Road, in said Andover. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 13, 1992 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 611 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 
7:14 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Arthur Johnson, OSA Pastor, 
St. Augustine Church, Andover. 

Salute to the flag was led by Chairman Charles Wesson, Jr., 
Selectman. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 14 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading of the Warrant and return of 
service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous 
consent that the Moderator refer to the articles by number and 
subject matter. 

A special award presentation was given by Selectmen Silverman to 
resident Sharon Petzold for her third place Bronze Medal for 
freestyle ballet skiing at the 1992 Winter Olympics at Albert'vile, 
France, and her first place finish at the United States National 
Ski Ballet Championships in Colorardo in March of 1992. 



75 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 



ARTICLE l. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for 
three years, and two members of the School Committee for three 
years. 

All the above candidates are to be voted for on one ballot. The 
polls will be open from 8:00 o'clock A.M. to 8:00 P. M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson declared the successful candidates 
to be as follows: 



James D. Doherty 
Gerald H. Silverman 
Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 
William J. Huston, Jr. 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 



Moderator for One Year 
Selectman for Three Years 
Selectman for Three Years 
School Committee for Three Years 
School Committee for Three Years 



ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Alcide J. 
LeGendre be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1992, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefore, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 3 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of 
money the Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations 
from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, 
including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for 
the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1992, and ending June 30, 1993. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Donald Robb. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to raise and 
appropriate the following sums of money: 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Including $210,432 in 

department receipts, 

$5000 in grants and $10,000 

in Wetland filing fees $2,115,209.00 

Including $3,500 for out- 
of-state travel and $146,610 
in department receipts 918,230.00 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



3,033,439.00 
2,661,397.00 



76 



cu 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

PERSONAL SERVICES Including $62,387 from rental 

income and $35,000 from 
Cemetery interest income 1,602,574.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $30,000 from 
rental income 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



1,841,122.00 
3,443, 696.00 
3, 316, 309.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Including $80,000 from 
ambulance receipts 



5,960,546.00 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $6,580 for 
out-of-state travel and 
$80,000 from ambulance 
receipts 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



495,434 . 00 
6, 455,980. 00 
6,295,980.00 



7 PERSONAL SERVICES 

8 .OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Including $2,750 for 
out-of-state travel 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



1,795,968.00 

4,914, 169.00 
6, 710, 137. 00 
6,710, 137.00 



10 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER SERVICES 



LIBRARY 

Including $58,514 from 

Merrimack Valley Library 

Consortium 980,778.00 

Including $700 for out-of- 
state travel; $2 0,4 39 from 
State Library Aid and $32,500 
from Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium 379,683.00 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



1,360,461.00 
1,249,008.00 



77 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 



UNCLASSIFIED 



11 COMPENSATION FUND 

12 RESERVE FUND 



Total Appropriated 
From Taxation 



30,000.00 
200,000.00 
230,000.00 
230,000.00 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



13 PERSONAL SERVICES 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $8,000 for 
out-of-state travel 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



18,089,390.00 

3,910,852.00 
22,000,242.00 
22,000,242.00 



15 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Total Appropriated 89,911.00 
From Taxation 89,911.00 



FIXED 

16 INTEREST EXPENSE 

17 BOND REDEMPTION 

18 STABILIZATION FUND 

19 INSURANCE EXPENSES 

20 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 

21 RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 

22 RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 
2 3 CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

24 NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 

25 RETIREMENT FUND 

26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 



2 


,098, 


,280. 


.00 


2, 


,792, 


,700. 


.00 




60, 


,000, 


,00 




899, 


, 500, 


,00 




175, 


, 000, 


,00 




32, 


, 600, 


.00 




28, 


385, 


,00 


1, 


,435, 


147. 


,00 




78, 


,000, 


,00 




437, 


,116. 


,00 


3, 


,278, 


,000. 


,00 



Including $50,000 from 
parking meter receipts for 
bond redemption 

Total Appropriated 11,314,728.00 

From Taxation 11., 264 , 728 . 00 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION $54,638,594.00 
TOTAL FROM TAXATION $53,817,712.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 
Article 11 Unpaid Bills 

Total 



263.56 



263.56 



78 



\c 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - FROM TRUST FUNDS 
Article 45 Veteran's Memorial Fund 

Total 



33 .000.00 



33,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 



Article 13 



Budget Transfer FY 92 To: 

Unemployment Compensation Fund $ 30,000.00 

Health Insurance Fund 100,000.00 

Town Counsel - Other Expenses 17,000.00 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses 20,000.00 



Article 13 



Total 

Budget Transfer FY 92 From: 
Debt Service - Interest Expense 
Town Counsel - Personal Services 
Municipal Maintenance - 
Personal Services 



Total 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 

Article 46 Water Main Construction 

Article 52 Sidewalk Improvements/Shawsheen Rd. 

and Beacon Street 
Article 53 Bancroft Pumping Station 

Article 55 School Committee - Planning 

Total 



167,000.00 



130, 000.00 
17, 000.00 
20,000.00 



$ . 167,000.00 

$ 2, 670,000.00 

400, 000.00 

1, 000, 000.00 

220, 000.00 

$ 4,290,000.00 



UNEXPENDED BALANCES LAPSED TO SURPLUS 



Article 9 Article 36, 1987 

Article 18, 1988 

Article 42, 1981 

Article 20, 1982 

Article 22, 1988 

Article 48, 1978 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



Article 17 



Article 43, 1982 
Pumping Station 
Article 21, 1984 
Pumping Station 



Shawsheen Street 

Light 

Fire Pumper 

Chapter 90 

Chapter 90 

Road Planning 

DPW Facilities 

Total 



Riverina Road 
Riverina Road 



47.25 

60.00 
274 .80 
108. 10 
212.80 
560.00 



Total 



$1,262.95 

$1,000,000 

866,837 

$1,866,837 



A true record 
ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



79 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

ARTICLE S. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for 
the ensuing year. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Donald Robb. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the salaries 
of the elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $125.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and 

$30.00 for each Special Town Meeting 
except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

School Committee - Chairman - $1,500.00 

Members - $1,200.00 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the salaries 
of elected Town Officers be zero dollars. 

The motion was lost by a majority vote 

The original motion was taken up and was PASSED by a MAJORITY VOTE. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter 
into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds 
allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. 
S. Government under any State or Federal grant program. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Margaret 
Jurgen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 6 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote, 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Works Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or 
either of them for the construction and • maintenance of public 
highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Virginia 
Keaten. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 7 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 



ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use in free cash to reduce the 1992-93 tax rate and to 
effect appropriations voted at the 1992 Annual Town Meeting. 

Article 8 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended 
appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Donald Robb. 



80 



124 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following 
unexpended appropriations be lapsed into surplus revenue by a 
MAJORITY vote: 

Article 36, 1987 Shawsheen Street Lights $ 47.25 

Article 18, 1988 Fire Pumper 60.00 

Article 42 1981 Chapter 90 274.80 

Article 20 1982 Chapter 90 108.10 

Article 22, 1988 Road Planning 212.80 

Article 48, 1978 DPW Facilities 560.00 



Total $1,262.95 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of 
eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Peter Volpe. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 10 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant. 

THE VOTE UNANIMOUS More than 2/3 vote required 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 
funds a sum not to exceed $5,000 to pay unpaid bills for which 
obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Virginia 
Keaten. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
transfer from available fund the sum of $263.56 to pay the 
following unpaid bill incurred in the prior fiscal year: Andover 
Family Chiropractic: $263.56 for the Police Department. 

THE VOTE UNANIMOUS 4/5 vote required 

ARTICLE 12. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
12 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to 
exceed $300,000.00 from amounts previously appropriated at the 
April 1, 1991, Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 33B. 

A report from the Andover Finance Committee was given by Frederic 
Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town 
transfer the sum of $167,000 from the following accounts: 

Debt Service - Interest Expense $130,000 

Town Counsel - Personal Services 17,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Personal Services 20, 000 

Total $167,000 

and appropriate to the following accounts: 

Unemployment Compensation Fund $ 30.000 

Health Insurance Fund 100,000 

Town Counsel - Other Expenses 17,000 

Municipal Maintenance - Other Expenses 20. 000 

Total $167,000 



125 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from Federal 
and State reimbursements for Hurricane Bob a sum not to exceed 
$100,000 and appropriate a sum not to exceed $100,000 for the 
Fiscal Year 1992 budget. 

Article 14 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to approve the acceptance 
by the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District of (1) Chapter 70A of the General Laws relating to an 
Equal Educational Opportunity Grant. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Donald 
Schroeder. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

15 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as amended by Chapter 
126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 1993 to allow those persons who qualify 
for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 59, Section 5. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Virginia 
Keaten. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

16 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond 
authorizations from prior Town Meetings or take any other action 
related thereto. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committe was given by Frederick 
Fitzgerald. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to rescind the 
following unissued bond authorizations by a MAJORITY vote: 

Article 43, 1982 Riverina Road Pumping Station $1,000,000 

Article 21, 1984 Riverina Road Pumping Station 866,837 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article IV, 
Section 6, of the General Bylaws, Estimate" of expenditures, as 
follows: 

Delete the words "third Friday of January" and replace with "second 
Friday of February." • 

Article 18 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 22F which 
permits the Town to set certain fees and charges. 

Article 19 was WITHDRAWN 



82 



i. 'J 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

ARTICLE 20. To see what action the Town will vote to take 
regarding the provisions of Chapter 138, Section 126 of the Acts of 
1991 amending Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, 
clause 41A and adopt a maximum gross receipts level for property 
tax deferrals for financial hardship for eligible individuals for 
fiscal years beginning July 1, 1992. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Virginia 
Keaten. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 20 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant and that the Town adopt a 
maximum gross receipts level of $40,000 by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F authorizing 
the Town Treasurer to enter into compensating balance agreements 
for banking services for a maximum three-year period beginning July 
1, 1992. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Peter Volpe. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 21 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 
bylaw for the regulation of the proceedings at ail annual and 
special Town Meetings of the Town of Andover: 

The Moderator shall permit a motion to reconsider a subject 
that has been voted upon if, immediately following the vote, 
it is determined that a quorum does not exist; the 
reconsideration to be the first order of business at the next 
session of the Town Meeting. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. • 

Article 22 was DEFEATED 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way Stouffer Circle, as shown on Plan Number 13788G, drawn 
by Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Inc., Surveyors, dated November 
18, 1983, as modified and approved by the Court, filed in the Land 
Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with 
Certificate of Title Number 9454 Page 221. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Mariann 
Lombardi . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
23 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way Raven's Bluff, as shown on a plan entitled, "Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. for Raven's Bluff* Scale: 1" = 40' 
Date: Jan. 24, 1983 Owner: Raven Realty Trust - Engineers: Dana 
F. Perkins & Assoc, Inc., which plan is recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 9104. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 



83 



C I 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13, 1992 



A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
24 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Yardley Road, as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
6985. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

Article 25 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Radcliffe Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 
Plan of Belmont Park in Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and 
recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
6985. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

Article 26 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Granli Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by 
the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Plan of Granli Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in 
Andover, Mass. of Granli Drive dated 10/16/84, revised 12/15/84, 
revised 2/7/85, Dana F. Perkins & Associates, Engineers and 
Surveyors", which plan is recorded at the Essex North Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 9649. 

On petition of Joan M. Sweeney and others. 

Article 27 was WITHDRAWN Not Laid Out 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way Fossen Way, as shown on a plan entitled, "Definitive 
Plan of High Park Subdivision Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of 
Fossen Way Scale: 1" = 40' Date: 8/31/84 Owner: Thomas P. and 
Katherine E.. Maloney, 249 River Road, Andover, Mass. Engineers: 
Dana F. Perkins & Assoc, Civil Engineers & Surveyors, Lowell & 
Reading, Mass." which plan is recorded with Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 9659. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Mariann 
Lombardi . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 28 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 



84 



a; 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the 
Board of Selectmen in laying out as a public way under provisions 
of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
Annotated, approve the name designated as RACHEL ROAD and approve 
the Drainage Easements and Water Easement as shown on the plans 
provided. Copies of the following Plans have been filed with the 
Town Clerk as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: 

"STREET ACCEPTANCE PLAN for ALISON WAY & RACHEL ROAD in ANDOVER, 
MA." Scale: 1" =40'. Dated January 4, 1991, revised December 24, 
1991, prepared by W. C. Cammett Engineering, Inc., Plan No. 90090. 

"ROADWAY AS-BUILT PLAN/PROFILE of RACHEL ROAD in ANDOVER, MA." 
Scale: Horz . : 1" = 40', Vert.: 1" = 4', Dated January 4, 1991, 
revised December 24, 1991, prepared by W. C. Cammett Engineering, 
Inc., Plan No. 90090. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was made by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

29 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 3.0. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the 
Board of Selectmen in laying out as a public way under provisions 
of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws 
Annotated, approve the name designated as ALISON WAY and approve 
the Drainage Easements and Water Easement as shown on the plans 
provided. Copies of the following Plans have been filed with the 
Town Clerk, as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: 

"STREET ACCEPTANCE PLAN for ALISON WAY & RACHEL ROAD in ANDOVER, 
MA." Scale: 1" =40', Dated January 4, 1991, revised December 24, 
1991, prepared by W. C. Cammett Engineering, Inc., Plan No. 90090. 

"ROADWAY AS-BUILT PLAN/PROFILE of ALISON WAY in ANDOVER, MA." 
Scale: Horz.: 1" = 40', Vert.: 1" = 4', Dated January 4, 1991, 
revised December 24, 1991, prepared by W. C. Cammett Engineering, 
Inc., Plan No. 90090. 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was given by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made ad duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

30 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, -Sugarbush Lane (Portion) , as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Sugarbush Lane Extension'" dated June 
21, 1990 and recorded with the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 11874. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell and others. 

Article 31 was WITHDRAWN Not Laid Out 



85 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Keystone Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by 
the Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan of land entitled 
"Definitive Plan of Hearthstone Village, Subdivision Plan of Land 
in Andover, Mass. of Keystone Way." Said plan being recorded with 
the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 11021. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was made by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

32, Keystone Way, as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Hearthstone Place, as shown on a plan which was 
approved by the Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan of 
land entitled "Definitive Plan of Hearthstone Village, Subdivision 
Plan of Land in Andover, Mass. of Hearthstone Place." Said plan 
being recorded with the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
10807. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was given by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

33, Hearthstone Place, as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY 
vote. 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way 
and name Carter Lane as approved by the Planning Board and laid out 
by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled: "Definitive 
Plan of Mill Dam Estates Subdivision Plan of Land in ' Andover, 
Mass." Dated October 21, 1985, and revised December 2, 1985, and 
January 15, 1986, prepared by Dana F. Perkins and Associates, Inc., 
which plan is recorded with North District of Essex Registry of 
Deeds as Plan No. 10577. Plan and deed, along with all necessary 
papers, on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Andrew A. Caffrey and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mariann 
Lombardi . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
34 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding a new subsection IV.B.43B, as follows: 

"43B. The temporary and seasonal placement of tables and chairs 
outside a permitted commercial structure for the convenience of 
patrons and other shoppers, as a use incidental and accessory to 
a permitted food or retail' sales establishment where the principal 
activity is the service or sale of food for consumption on or off 
the premises, or the retail sale of merchandise. Outdoor table and 
chairs shall not be located within a parking lot or a public right- 
of-way and shall not interfere with pedestrian access or access for 
emergency purposes. 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC 
N N N N BA 



OP 


GB 


MU 


IG 


IA 


ID 


N 


BA 


BA 


BA 


N 


N" 



86 



30 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
35 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE UNANIMOUS More than 2/3 required 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, by deleting in its entirety 
subsection IV.B.29.(f). 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was given by Susan Stott. 

Article 3 6 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES - 33 NO - 4 25 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) Delete Section IV. B. 29(f) in its entirety and amend Section 
IV. B by adding the following subsection: 



"52. Storage of one unregistered vehicle or of one vehicle not in 
condition for travel, subject to the provisions of Section 
VI. T. 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 

Y Y YN Y YYYYYY" 

(2) Add a new Section VI. T: 

" VI. T. Unregistered vehicle or vehicle not in condition for 
travel: This section shall apply to all motor vehicles other than 
(1) vehicles defined in subsections IV.B.45 and IV.B.46; (2) 
vehicles with current registrations and current inspection 
stickers; and (3)' vehicles stored in a garage or other enclosed 
structure . 

1. Vehicles which are not currently registered and inspected 
shall not be stored within view of any public way or abutting 
residential property, unless one of the following exceptions 
applies: 

a. One unregistered but operable vehicle may be stored in 
public view on a lot if it can be demonstrated that the 
vehicle was registered and passed inspection within the 
twelve month period from the date on which the owner of 
the vehicle is issued written notice that said vehicle 
may be in violation of this Section. 

b. The vehicle is covered with a standard vehicle cover of 
a type manufactured and sold for that purpose. 

2. A vehicle not in condition for travel shall be a vehicle which 
is in such disrepair that it is inoperable and/or is 
undergoing major repairs. The vehicle shall be removed from 
public view or from the premises within forty-eight (48) hours 
of receipt of written notice from the Inspector of Buildings." 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan Stott. 

87 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 13. 1992 

It was moved and seconded that Article 37 be approved as printed in 
the Warrant. 

A vote was called to close debate and was approved by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 37 was VOTED as printed in the warrant. 

VOTE: YES - 388 NO - 52 A 2/3 vote required 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By adding the following term and definition to Section II: 

"30. Mausoleum: A large tomb, usually a stone building, which 
may feature an interior-like chapel area, constructed 
within the boundaries of an existing cemetery, for the 
purpose of . above-ground interment of human remains." 

(2) By adding the following subsection 35A. to Section IV. B., 
Table of Use Regulations: 

"35A. Mausoleum SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 

BA BA BA N N N BA N N N N" 

On petition of Clifford J. Jurdi and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was made by Susan Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 
38 as printed in the Warrant. 

It was voted by a majority vote to allow William Habib, an 
unregistered voter, to speak about Article 38. 

A motion was made to close discussion on Article 38 and was 
approved by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 38 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: YES - 14 NO - 336 A 2/3 vote required 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Urbelis and duly seconded, it was 
voted to adjourn at 10:25 P. M. until Tuesday, April 14, 1992 at 
7:00 P. M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen 
Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 

The check list were used at the entrance and showed 410 voters were 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, a 
8:00 P. M. . 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 5 non-voters to the meeting. 



88 



132 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 



ARTICLE 39: To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article. VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) Delete Section VI. A in its entirety and replace with the 
following: 

Section VI. Other requirements. 

A. Parking: 

1. Objectives: The objectives of this section of the Bylaw are as follows: 

a. Promote traffic safety by assuring adequate places for storing of motor vehicles off the 
street, and for their orderly access and egress to and from the public street; 

b. Increase the traffic-carrying capacity of streets and highways in the town and obtain a 
more efficient utilization of on-street curbside parking; 

c. Reduce hazards to pedestrians upon public sidewalks; 

d. Protect adjoining lots and the general public from nuisances and hazards such as: 

(1) Noise, glare of headlights, dust and fumes, resulting from the operation of 
motor vehicles; 

(2) Glare and heat from parking lots; 

(3) A lack of visual relief from expanses of paving; 

(4) Accelerated run-off of surface water from land covered by impervious materials. 

2. Applicability: No building permit or Certificate of Occupancy shall be issued for the construction 
of a new building, the enlargement of an existing building, the development of a use not located 
in a building, the redevelopment of an existing building, or the change from one type of use to 
another, unless off-street parking is provided in accordance with this section of the Bylaw. 

3. Interpretation of Section VI. A.: The following rules for interpretation of Section VI. A. shall 
apply: 

a. Fractional numbers: In the computation of required parking spaces, only the fraction 
of one-half or more shall be counted as one (1) space. 

b. Number of employees: Where the parking requirement is based on the number 
of employees, the number shall be based on the number of employees on the 
largest shift. 

c. Change of use: A change of use for the purposes of this section of the Bylaw shall be 
a change in part or all of an existing building or lot from one use category to another as 
permitted in the Table of Use Regulations, Section IV. B. 

d. Maximum rate occupancy: The maximum floor area allowances allowed per occupant 
as required in the Massachusetts State Building Code, Table S06, as amended from time 
to time. 

4. Number of Parking Spaces: The following Table indicates the minimum number of parking spaces 
required for the corresponding type of use. Where a use is not specifically included in the 
schedule below,- it is intended that the regulations for the most nearly comparable use, as 
determined by the Building Inspector, shall apply. 



Table of Off-Street Parking Requirements 



Use 



Parking Requirement 



a. Residential Uses: 

(1) Single family dwelling 

(2) Dwelling unit in a multi-family dwelling 



Two (2) per dwelling unit 

One (1) space for each studio or one (1) bedroom 
unit; two (2) spaces for each unit with two (2) or 
more bedrooms 



(3) Subsidized low or moderate income dwelling 



One (1) space for each studio unit and one (1) 
bedroom unit or elderly housing unit; one and one- 
half spaces for each unit of two (2) or more 



89 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 



bedrooms 



b. Institutional. Recreational, and Educational Uses: 

(1) Elementary, secondary schools 

(2) Child care facility 



(3) College, technical school, or other school 
operated as a gainful business 



Two (2) spaces per classroom 

One (1) space per ten (10) children, maximum rated 
occupancy, plus one (I) space per employee 

One (1) space for each four (4) persons maximum 
occupancy 



(4) Places of assembly, including conference 
facilities, indoor athletics or recreation 
or amusement facilities 



(5) Hospital, convalescent or nursing home 



(6) Medical center, health clinic or office 



One (1) space for each three (3) seats, and/or 
each sixty (60) inches of permanent bench sitting 
area, or, where no fixed bench seats are used, one 
(I) space for each four (4)- persons maximum 
occupancy 

One (I) space per two (2) beds plus' one (1) space 
per employee 

In the Office Park District, one ( 1 ) space for each iwo 
hundred (200) square feet of usable floor area and 
four (4) spaces for each doctor or dentist. 
In other districts, three (3) spaces per treatment area. 



c. Commercial Uses: 



(1) Retail, personal or consumer service 
establishment, convenience store 
(Amended 4-12-88, Art. 95) 



(2) Funeral home 



(3) Gas service station, automotive repair garage 



(4) Banking establishments 



In the Shopping Center District, at least three (3) 

spaces for each two hundred (200) square feet of 

gross floor area . 

In the General Business District, one (1) space for 

each 250 square feet of gross floor area on street 

level floors; one (I) space for each 350 square feet of 

gross floor on other floors: and one (I) space for 

each 600 square feet of gross floor area in basement 

level floors. 

In other districts, one (1) space for each two hundred 

and fifty (250) square feel of gross floor area 

One (1) space for each four patron seats in the largest 
assembly area 

One (1) space for each employee on principal work 
shift plus four (4) spaces for each service bay, or 
three hundred (300) square feet of interior service 
area 

One (1) space for each 250 sq.ft. of gross floor area 
for lobby/banking area plus one (1) space for each 
300 sq.ft. of gross floor area for office/operations 
area 



(5) Restaurant or similar establishment 



(6) Hotel, motel 



One (1) space for each two (2) seats plus one and a 
half (1.5) spaces for each two employees 

One (1) space per rental room or suite; plus one (1) 
space per four (4) persons maximum occupancy for 
each assembly room (banquet or public meeting 
room); plus spaces required for other accessory uses 
on the premises 



(7) Business, professional or administrative offices 



One (1) space for each three hundred (300) sq.ft. 
gross floor area 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



APRIL 14 , 1992 



d. Industrial Uses; 

(t) Lab, manufacturing, processing 
and testing 

(2) Warehouse, storage, wholesale- or 
similar service uses 



One (1) space per 300 square feet usable floor area 



One (I) space per 600 square feet of usable floor area 



e. Miscellaneous Uses: 



Required spaces to be determined by the Planning 
Department and reported in a memorandum to be 
filed with the building permit or Certificate of 
Occupancy 



5. 



Design Standards: 



Applicability: The design standards stated in this section shall apply to parking areas for uses 
other than a one-family or two-family dwelling. See Sections VI. A. 6 through 9 for specific design 
standards for different zoning districts. 

Parking dimensions: The minimum dimensions of parking spaces and maneuvering aisles shall 
be as follows: 



Minimum Parking Space and Aisle Dimensions 
for Parking Areas 



Parking 


Stall 


Depth of 


Ancle 


Width 


Parking So. 




S* C* 


' H* . S C H 


61-90 degrees 


9 8 


12 18 16 18 


46-60 


9 8 


12 18 16 18 


45 


9 8 


12 18 16 18 


Parallel 


8 8 


12 22 18 22 



Width of 




Maneuverin 


g Aisle 


(One-wav) 


Two-wav) 


S C H ■ 


All Spaces 


24 24 24 


24 


18 13 18 


24 


15 14 15 


24 


14 12 14 


24 



* S = Standard car space C = Compact car space H = Handicapped space 



Layout: 

(1) Access to and egress from all parking areas shall be only via driveways which meet the 
design standards of Section VI.A.5.e.; 

(2) All portions of all parking spaces, loading areas and maneuvering aisles shall be set back 
a minimum of five (5) feet from any street or way and a minimum of five (5) feet from 
any property line. Curbs, wheel stops, screening or similar barriers shall be installed 
along the setback line for parking and loading to prevent vehicles from being parked or 
driven within required setback areas or required landscaped areas; 

(3) Each required off-street parking space and loading area shall be designed so that any 
motor vehicle may proceed to and from said parking space or loading area without 
requiring the moving of any other vehicle or the passing over of any other parking space 
or loading area; 

(4) Each parking area shall be designed to provide a circulation system within the lot so that 
all vehicles may exit from and enter into the adjacent street or way by being driven in 
a forward direction and no vehicle shall be required to enter or leave by backing; 

(5) ' All required parking areas shall be paved and parking spaces marked- to provide 

delineation between parking stalls and aisles. 



Handicapped parking: 

(1) Parking facilities shall provide designated parking spaces designed for physically 
handicapped persons in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Architectural 
Barriers Board of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works; 

(2) Each handicapped parking space shall be clearly marked by a sign and shall be located 
near the entrance of the building served. 

Driveways: 

(1) The maximum number of driveways permitting entrance to and exit from a lot shall be 
limited to two (2) per streetline; 

(2) The minimum width of a driveway used for two-way traffic shall be twenty-four (24) 
feet. The minimum width of a driveway used for one-way traffic shall be fourteen (14) 



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SOJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING' - APRIL 14, 1992 



feet. The maximum width shall not exceed thirty (30) feet; 
(3) Driveways shall be located so as to minimize conflict with traffic on public streets and 

where good visibility and sight distances are available to observe approaching pedestrian 
and vehicular traffic. 

f. Loading Areas: 

(1) An adequate number of off-street loading areas shall be provided for any use which may 
be serviced by delivery vehicles; 

(2) Loading areas shall he located in side or rear yards only; 

(3) Each loading area shall be located separately from employee and customer parking and 
shall be designed to protect pedestrian ' safety and avoid traffic 
conflicts with vehicles within, without, and entering and leaving the lot where the loading 
area is located; 

(4) No area may be utilized and counted as both a required parking space and a required 
loading area; 

(5) Each loading area shall consist of a bay measuring at least thirty (30) feet long, twelve 
(12) feet wide and fourteen (14) feet high if covered and a maneuvering space equal to 
the length of the bay. 

g. Maintenance: Parking areas, loading spaces, and landscaping shall be continuously maintained, 
and whenever necessary, surfacing, lighting, parking space markings and plantings shall be 
replaced or repaired, and drainage structures maintained . Failure to adequately maintain parking 
facilities shall be considered a violation of this Bylaw. 

Parking in the Apartment Districts 

a. Required spaces shall be located either in an off-street paved area or in a garage or carport. 

b. Said spaces shall be located within two hundred (200) feet from the outside entrance to the 
dwelling unit being served. 

c. Said spaces located in a driveway providing access to more than one dwelling unit shall not reduce 
the effective width of the driveway to less than twelve (12) feet. 

d. Any way or driveway providing principal access to six (6) or more dwelling units or eight (8) or 
more parking spaces shall conform to applicable provisions of the Planning Board regulations for 
minor residential ways. Before granting a Special Permit the Board of Appeals shall request a 
report from the Planning Board on the extent of such conformity. 

Parking in the General Business Districts: 

a. Provision of Parking: Off-street parking shall be provided as specified in Section VI. A. 4 of this 
Bylaw (Table of Off-Street Parking Requirements). 

b. Location of Parking Spaces: The required number of off-street spaces shall be provided on the 
same lot as the use or uses in question unless the Planning Board grants a Special Permit for a 
change in parking space requirements under Section VI. A. 9 of this Bylaw. 

c. No additional parking spaces required: No additional parking spaces shall be required for a 
proposed land use in accordance with Section VI. A. 4 if: 

(1) a change of use or rearrangement of uses in an existing building does not result in an 
increase in the number of required parking spaces; 

(2) the total computed parking spaces required for a particular use, including a particular use 
in an existing multi-use building, is six (6) spaces or less. This shall not apply to 
proposals involving the total renovation/redevelopment of a structure; 

(3) having applied (1) and (2) above, a chance of use in an existing building results in a net 
increase in the number of required parking spaces, and that net increase is three (3) 
spaces or less. If the change of use results in a net increase of more than three (3) 
spaces, then the total number of parking spaces shall be provided. 

d. Multiple Uses Sharing a Common Parking Lot: Required parking spaces may be provided for two 
(2) or more uses on a common lot if the total space available is not less than the sum of the spaces 
required for each use individually. The required number of spaces on a common lot may be 
reduced by a Special Permit under Section VI. A. 9 if it can be shown that the parking needs for 
the uses are such that a lower total will serve all uses adequately. 

e. Nonconforming Buildings and Uses: The following preexisting, nonconforming buildings and uses 
need not meet current requirements of this section of the Zoning Bylaw but shall continue to meet 
the requirements of the Bylaw in effect when the building or use was first lawfully begun: 

(1) Buildings and uses which were lawfully in existence at the time of the adoption of this 
Bylaw or any amendment thereto; 

(2) Buildings and uses for which a building permit or special permit was issued before the 
first publication of notice of the Public Hearing on such bylaw; and 

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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14 , 1992 

(3) Replacements after catastrophe if the building is rebuilt not to exceed its precatastrophe 

size and if no change in use occurs (see Section VI. A.7.g). 

f. Extensions or Alterations of Nonconforming Buildings and Uses: Extensions or alterations of a 
preexisting, nonconforming building or use which requires a Special Permit under Section VILA 
shall provide only the additional number of parking spaces which would be required for the 
extension or alteration. 

g. Replacement After Catastrophe: The following parking requirements shall apply to a building or 
structure which has been damaged by fire, explosion or other catastrophe: 

(1) If a building or structure which did not conform with Section VI. A. 4 of the Zoning 
Bylaw is rebuilt not to exceed its precatastrophe size and if no change in use occurs, 
continuance of that nonconformance will be allowed: 

(2) Any change in use.shall require the building or structure to conform with Section VI. A. 4 
of the Zoning Bylaw; 

(3) If a building or structure is rebuilt to exceed its precatastrophe size, the additional 
number of parking spaces which would be required for the excess floor area must be. 
provided. 

h. Compact car spaces: In parking lots of more than forty (40) parking spaces, up to thirty (30) 

percent of the spaces may be designed for compact cars to service all-day parkers in accordance 
with the design standards of Section VI. A. 5. Compact car stalls shall be grouped in one or more 
contiguous areas and conspicuously identified by signs or pavement markings. 

8. Parking in the Industrial Districts: In all Industrial districts, (he following shall apply: 

a. Adequate off-street parking must be provided on the premises to service all parking demand 
created by new construction, whether through new structures or through additions to existing ones, 
or by change of use creating higher parking demands. 

b. Buildings, structures and land uses in existence on the effective date of these provisions are not 
subject to these parking requirements and may be rebuilt, altered or repaired, but not enlarged or 
changed in use, without becoming subject to them. 

c. In applying for building or occupancy permits, the applicant must demonstrate that the minimum 
parking requirements set forth below will be met for the new demand without counting existing 
parking. 

d. The number of parking spaces required by Section VI. A. 4. may be reduced upon the written 
determination of the Building Inspector, based on the Planning Board's written recommendation 
to him, following its site plan review, that special circumstances render a lesser number of spaces 
adequate for all parking needs. In order to qualify for a reduction, the Petitioner must present a 
site plan showing that all parking spaces needed to meet the requirements of the Table of Off- 
Slreet Parking Requirements (Section VI. A. 4.) could be built on the site. Those spaces to be 
waived shall be marked 'Reserve Parking Area(s)" on the plan, which shall be kept on file with 
a copy of the Planning Board's written recommendation and a copy of the Building Inspector's 
decision to grant a reduction. The "Reserve Parking Area(s)" are to be maintained as landscaped 
areas unless and until construction of additional parking spaces is required by the Building 
Inspector. No building other than parking spaces will ever be allowed in this area. 
(Amended 4-8-86, Art. 58) 

e. Only one driveway or entranceway will be permitted in any one hundred fifty (150) feet of 
frontage unless the frontage is less, in which case, a single driveway access to the property will 
be permitted. 

f. Each parking area shall contain no more than two hundred forty (240) parking spaces. 

g. Each parking area shall be enclosed (except for access points) by a landscaped buffer not less than 
twelve (12) feet wide, planted with shade trees. 

h. Each parking area shall have interior landscaping areas, primarily planted with trees, equivalent 

in size to five (5) per cent of that parking area's total pavement area. 

i. There shall be no more than thirty (30) spaces in any uninterrupted row. 

j. The size of a parking space may be reduced to a compact car space as presented in Section VI. A. 5 

for those spaces serving all-day parkers. Uses which generate frequent parking space turnover 
shall be required to have the standard size parking spaces. 

9. Special Permits: In accordance with Section VIII. C. (Special Permits) and the objectives set forth in Section 
VI. A., the Planning Board may grant the following Special Permits: 

a. Main Street access in the General Business District and Mixed Use District: Where alternative 
access locations are feasible, parking lot driveways shall not provide access onto Main Street 
unless granted a Special Permit by the Planning Board upon its determination that such access onto 
Main Street is dictated by consideration of safety, congestion or conflict with other premises. 
(Amended 4-6-88, Art. 62) 

b. Parking lot design in the General Business District: The design of a parking lot may differ from 

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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 < ~> 

the requirements of Section VI. A. 5 if granted * Special Permit by the Planning Board provided 
that such design satisfies the objectives of Section VI. A. and (he design is prepared by a 
professional engineer or landscape architect. 

Special Permit for a Change in Parking Space Requirements: The number of off-street parking 
spaces required in accordance with Section VI. A. of this Bylaw for a use or uses in the General 
Business District may be changed by Special Permit in accordance with the following provisions: 

(1) Special Permit Criteria: The Planning Board, by Special Permit, may allow remote 
parking lots, shared parking lots, or any enforceable alternatives which it deems reason- 
able, based on the following criteria, and other applicable provisions presented in this 
subsection: 

(a) The capacity, location and current level of use of existing parking facilities, both 
public and private; 

(b) The efficient and maximum use of the General Business District in terms of 
parking needs and services provided; 

(c) The relief of traffic and parking congestion; 

(d) The safety of pedestrians; 

(e) The provision of reasonable access either by walking distance or shuttle vehicle 
arrangements; 

(0 The maintenance of the character of the area. 

(2) Shared parking: Shared private parking facilities for different buildings or uses may be 
allowed by Special Permit in the General Business District, subject to the following 
provisions: 

(a) Up to 50% of the parking spaces serving a building may be used jointly for 
other uses not normally open, used or operated during similar hours. The 
applicant must show that the peak parking demand and principal operating hours 
for each is use are suitable for a common parking facility." 

(b) A written agreement defining the joint use acceptable tn the Planning Board of 
the common parking facility shall be executed by all parties concerned and 
approved by the Planning Board as part of the Special Permit process. Such 
agreement shall be recorded at the North Essex Registry of Deeds. 

(c) Any subsequent change in land uses for which the shared parking proposal was 
approved, and which results in the need for additional parking spaces, shall 
require a new Special Permit application under this subsection. 

(3) Remote Parking: Remote (satellite) parking areas may be authorized by the Planning 
Board by Special Permit, subject to the following provisions: 

(a) The satellite parking spaces will be used solely by the employees, and where 
practicable, clientele of the commercial use ; 

(b) The off-site parking spaces shall be located to adequately serve the proposed 
use, and shall be within 600 hundred feet of the building served for clientele of 
the commercial use. Off-site parking for employees of the business may be 
located within a distance of 1200 feet, unless shuttle vehicle arrangements are 
provided as a condition of the Special Permit. The parking distance shall be 
measured by the shortest route of pedestrian access, entrance to entrance. 

(4) Pedestrian Access: Any proposals submitted under Section VI. A. 9 which, in the opinion 
of the Planning Board, provide direct and vital pedestrian access to other abutting 
commercial properties and serve to improve pedestrian accessibility in the General 
Business- district, may reduce the number of parking spaces required by 15%. Pedestrian 
access shall be provided through improved pathways, stairway access, or other physical 
improvements, and such access shall be clearly marked. 

(5) Off-Street Parking Fund: Land use proposals in the General Business District seeking 
a Special Permit pursuant to Section VI. A. 9, may propose a one-time payment into an 
Off-Street Parking Fund for the purpose of developing public parking spaces. The Off- 
Street Parking Fund shall be separate from the General Fund and shall be established in 
a manner determined by Town Meeting. Expenditures from this fund shall require the 
approval of Town Meeting, or the approval of an agency so authorized. Revenues from 
this fund shall be used exclusively for parking related projects which include land 
acquisition, parking facility construction, and engineering drawings and specifications. 
Parking facilities developed from this fund shall directly benefit the aforementioned land 
use. 

Proposals for a payment in lieu of off-street parking spaces shall meet the following 
requirements: 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 

(a) Payment into this fund shall be made as an alternative to providing the required 
on-site parking spaces and in accordance with a fee schedule adopted by the 
Board of Selectmen. The fee schedule shall consider the estimated cost of land 
and improvements necessary to support (he parking requirements of the proposed 
use. 

(b) Payment into the Off-Street Parking Fund" shall be made prior to the issuance of 
a building permit. 

(c) Such payment in lieu of providing on-site parking spaces shall run with the land, 
and any subsequent change in use that requires more parking than provided for 
shall require subsequent action under Section VI. A. 9 to satisfy (he additional 
parking required. A refund of such payment shall not be made if a change of 
use requires less parking. 

(6) Joint (shared) driveways: Joint driveways shall be permitted by Special Permit in (he 

General Business District, subject to (he following provisions: 

(a) Joint driveways, for the purposes of Section VI. A., shall be regulated by a 
binding agreement satisfactory in form to Town Counsel and recorded at the 
North Essex Registry of Deeds. 

(b) Joint driveways shall serve no more than two lots and shall be designed to 
provide access to another parking area or may straddle two lots if both lots are 
located in the General Business District. 

(c) Joint driveways shall be designed so as to minimize conflict with traffic on 
public streets and with due regard to interior circulation and separation of 
pedestrian and vehicular traffic. 



A report of the Planning Board was given by John O'Brien. 

A motion was made and seconded to amend article 39 by inserting the following: after subsection VI. A. 7C.(3) 
on page 54 of the Fin Com Report, the following subsection c(4): 

"4. Provided, however that this subsection c shall not apply to any lot that is now operating under a special 
permit issued by the Planning Board or the Zoning Board of Appeals which waives the parking requirements of this 
section VI. A. of this bylaw." 

The motion to amend Article 39 was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY VOTE. 

A motion was made to move the question and was passed by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 39 was VOTED as printed in the Warrant. 

Vote: YES - 295 No - 33 A 2/3 vote requiered 



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iriTOnDMCn nMMlUf m/-it. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as follows: 

(1) By deleting subsection IV.B.37 in its entirety and 
substituting the following: 

"IV. B. 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB MU IG IA ID 
37. A child care Y Y Y YY YYYYYY 
facility or program 
providing day care to 
more than six (6) children, 
as defined in MGL Chapter 
40A, Section 3, and licensed 
by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts under the 
provisions of Chapter 28A, 
subject to the provisions of 
Section VI. S." 

(2) By adding a new subsection VI. S to read as follows: 
"VI. S. Child Care Facility 

1. A proposal for a child care facility shall be subject to the 
Site Plan Review provisions of Section VI. Q. 2. The scope of 
this site plan review shall be limited by the provisions of 
MGL Chapter 40A, Section 3 and this subsection VI. S. 

2. Child care facilities shall comply with the zoning 
requirements of the zoning district in which it is located, 
with the following exceptions: 

a. Child care facilities proposed as new construction or in 
existing structures in the SRA, SRB, and SRC districts 
shall meet the following zoning requirements: 

(1) The minimum lot area for a day care facility shall 
be one acre. 

(2) The day care facility shall be located in the 
principal structure on the property. 

(3) The maximum building coverage of the day care 
facility shall not exceed 3000 square feet. 

(4) At least 35% of the minimum lot area shall be 
retained in open space. Open space shall mean 
areas without structures, parking lots, or 
driveways. 

3. A minimum of one off-street drop-off/pick-up area per twenty- 
five children shall be provided on the premises. . 

4. Outdoor play areas and parking lot areas located along 
property lines common with residential property or property 
zoned as SRA, SRB or SRC shall be screened with not less than 
a six-foot high sight-obscuring fence or wall or with 
evergreen plants five feet in height at the time of planting. 

5. A copy of the license from the Office for Children authorizing 
the child care facility and indicating the number of children 
the facility is licensed for shall be filed with the Planning 
Department prior to the issuance of a Certificate of 
Occupancy. " 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1992 

(3) Amend Section VI. A. 4 Table of Off-Street Parking Requirements 
by adding the following subsection c and reordering subsection c 
through m: 

"c. Child care facility One (1) space per ten children 

maximum rated occupancy, plus one 
(1) space per employee on the 
largest shift" 

A report of the Planning Board was read by Mariann Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 

40 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for the 
purpose of establishing an Off-street Parking Fund revolving 
account for Fiscal Year 1993 in accordance with the Andover Zoning 
Bylaw, Section VI . A. 9 . c. (5) , and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to make expenditures in an amount not to exceed $1,000.00 
for FY-1993, or take any other action related thereto. 

A report of the Andover Finance Committee was given by Donald 
Schroeder . 

The report of the Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 

41 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 41 was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $500.00 (Five Hundred Dollars) for the purpose of 
constructing a footbridge across Fish Brook, approximately 10 feet 
from Water Department right-of-way on Town of Andover Conservation 
Land. 

On petition of Elizabeth Tentarelli and others. 

Article 42 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following 
bylaw for the regulation of the proceedings at all annual and 
special Town Meetings of the Town of Andover: 

Any member of the Town Meeting who speaks to a subject under 
consideration, shall be given, if he or she so requests, the 
privilege of yielding the floor for the purpose of allowing 
any other Town Meeting member or members in the room to pose 
questions or to present points of view pertaining to the 
subject under consideration, while retaining the floor to 
respond to such questions and points of view. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 43 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant. 

Article 4 3 was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY vote 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14. 1992 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to accept those 
provisions of "An Act Providing a Local Option Early Retirement 
Program for Municipal Employees and Teachers" which apply to 
municipal employees, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Article 44 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum not to 
exceed $33,000 from the Post-War Rehabilitation Fund and 
appropriate said sum for the purposes of constructing a Veterans' 
memorial and related expenses at Elm Square, or take any action 
related thereto. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Frederic 
Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 
45 as printed in the Warrant. 

The following substitute motion was accepted by the Moderator, 
moved and seconded: 

That the Town vote to transfer the sum of $33,000 from the Post-war 
Rehabilitation Fund and appropriate said sum for the purposes of 
constructing a Veterans' Memorial and related expenses at Elm 
Square, and that no funds in excess of $3000.00 be spent until all 
project funds are raised and that final project design and 
specifications are subject to Town Manager and Board of Selectmen 
approval . 

An amendment to the substitute motion was moved and seconded to 
replace the words "Elm Square" and substitute the words " Central 
Park". The amendment was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY vote. 

The substitute motion was then taken up and was APPROVED by a 
MAJORITY vote. 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $2,670,000 or any 
greater or lesser sum for the purpose of laying and relaying water 
mains of not less than six inches but no more than sixteen inches 
in diameter and for costs incidental and related thereto, including 
the acquisition of any easements required in connection therewith, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Peter Volpe. 

A report by the Planning - Board was read by Susan Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$2,670,000 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of laying and 
relaying water mains of not less than six inches but less than 
sixteen inches in diameter and for costs incidental and related 
thereto, including the acquisition of any easements required in 
connection therewith, in all of or a portion of the following 
streets; South Main Street, Gardner Avenue, Hidden Road, Sunset 
Rock Road, Alderbrook Road, Ballardvale Road, Holt Road, Salem 
Street, Chapel Avenue, Bartlet Street, Morton Street and Park 
Street, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not 
exceeding $2,670,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
8(5), of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS A 2/3 vote required 

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142 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14. 1992 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the Town Manager to take such action as may be 
requested by the North East Solid Waste Committee to facilitate the 
refunding of bonds issued to finance the solid waste resource 
recovery facility referred to in the Service Agreement between the 
Town and Massachusetts Refusetech, Inc., including without 
limitation the substitution of Wheelabrator Technologies, Inc., for 
Allied-Signal, Inc., as the guarantor of performance under the 
Service Agreement and the execution and delivery of such amendments 
to the Service Agreement and other agreements with the North East 
Solid Waste Committee as the Selectmen shall determine necessary 
and in the best interests of the Town to effect such refunding; or 
act in any other manner in relation thereto. 

A report of the Andover Finance Committee was given by Margaret 
Jurgen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
47 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to require that, 
henceforth, the Selectmen shall provide each voter of the Town of 
Andover with an official copy of the Warrant for any annual or 
special Town Meeting, to be used for the conduct of the business of 
such Town Meeting, and stating the time and place of holding the 
meeting and the subjects to be acted upon thereat, in compliance 
with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 39, Section 10; such 
document to be devoid of editorial comment, recommendations and 
statements of approval or disapproval of any kind. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 

A report of the Andover Finance Committee was given by Frederick 
Fitzgerald. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 48 was moved as printed 
in the Warrant. 

A motion was moved and seconded to move the question. The motion 
was approved by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 48 was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY vote 

Mr. Doyle asked for a quorum count. A standing count found 384 
registered voters present. 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of -Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 80, Section 13B relative to 
deferral of betterment assessments for qualified property owners 
eligible for tax deferrals under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 59, Section 5, clause 41A. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Donald 
Schroeder. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was .VOTED to approve Article 
49 as printed in the Warrant by a MAJORITY vote. 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate a sum not to exceed $4,000.00 for the first year's, 
operation, and to require that, henceforth, all regular and special 
meetings of the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover shall be 
recorded officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder 
or by other means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting 
recording of which copies and transcripts shall be made available 
to the public at no greater than actual cost. 

On petition of John Doyle and others. 
99 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14. 1992 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 
50 as printed in the Warrant. 

After discussion, a motion was made and seconded to move the 
question. The motion was approved by a 2/3 vote. 

Article 50 was DEFEATED by a MAJORITY vote. 

A call for a Quorum count was called and denied by the Moderator as 
we had just concluded a quorum count. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II, 
Section 1, of the Andover Town By-Laws by striking out the words 
"fourth Monday of March" and replacing them with the words "first 
Tuesday of April". 

Article 51 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $400,000 for the 
purpose of reconstructing or constructing a new bituminous concrete 
sidewalk with new granite curb in the following areas: 1) the 
existing sidewalk on the northerly side of Shawsheen Road, 2) the 
existing sidewalk on the westerly side of Beacon Street, and 1) 
other areas as needed, or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Peter Volpe. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mariann 
Lombardi. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$400,000 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of reconstructing 
or constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with new granite 
curb in the following areas: 1) the existing sidewalk on the 
northerly side of Shawsheen Road; 2) the existing sidewalk on the 
westerly side of Beacon Street; and 3) other areas in the Town, and 
that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the. approval 
of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding $400,000 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7 (5), of the General 
Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 



VOTE: YES - 293 NO - 26 A 2/3 vote required 

A quorum count was called by Town Counsel Urbelis. The standing 
count found 354 registered voters present. 



ARTICLE 53 » To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of 
one million dollars ($1,000,000) for the construction and equipping 
of a pumping station to replace the existing Bancroft Road Pumping 
Station and all necessary appurtenances; and to determine whether 
the same shall be raised by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing; and to authorize 
the acceptance of Federal or State aid for the above; or take any 
other action. 

A report of the Andover Finance Committee was given by Virginia 
Keaten. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan Stott. 

100 



4 4 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14. 1992 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$1,000,000 be hereby appropriated for the construction and 
equipping of a pumping station to replace the existing Bancroft 
Road Pumping Station and for all necessary appurtenances and other 
costs incidental and related thereto, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $1,000,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 8(4), of the General Laws, as amended and 
supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: UNANIMOUS 2/3 vote required 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of 
Andover Code of Bylaws, Article XI, Section 7, Licensing and 
regulation of shooting galleries and shooting ranges, as follows: 

Subsection (1) - Change last line to read: Licenses under this 
Article shall be issued only to an individual, individuals, or non- 
profit organization. 

Subsection (3) - Add: The Board of Selectmen may grant and may 
suspend or revoke at their pleasure such a license upon such terms 
and conditions as they deem proper. 

Subsection (7), (A) - Change first line to delete: The applicant 
shall be an individual or individuals (as opposed to a corporation 
or other entity), and replace with: The applicant shall be an 
individual, individuals, or non-profit organization, 

Subsection (7), (B) - Delete and replace with: The applicant, if 
an individual or individuals, shall be of sound character and 
qualified, (or if a non-profit organization, shall be qualified) in 
the judgment of the Board of Selectmen to hold a license for the 
conduct of a facility involving the use of potentially deadly 
instruments. 

Subsection (7) , (F) - Add after "for" in the third line: "licenses 
granted to non-profit organizations or for" 

Subsection (9) - Add: If the applicant is a non-profit 
organization, the names, residential addresses and telephone 
numbers of the organization's officers and directors or trustees 
shall also be provided to the Town Clerk and shall be accurate at 
all times. 

On petition of Joseph R. Peters and others. 

Article 54 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $250,000 for 
architectural/engineering fees associated with the preparation of 
Preliminary Plans and Designs for renovation and/or construction of 
school buildings. 

A report of the Andover Finance Committee was given by Joanne 
Marden ' 



101 



' i J 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14. 1992 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$220,000 be hereby appropriated for architectural and engineering 
services for plans and specifications for the construction, 
reconstruction, remodeling or extraordinary repairs of school 
buildings and buildings occupied by the School Department, 
including additions thereto, and for costs incidental and related 
thereto, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not 
exceeding $220,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(21) 
and 7(22) , of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any 
other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

VOTE: YES - 337 NO - 3 A 2/3 vote required 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for the 
purpose of establishing a Community Services revolving account for 
ticket sales and related trip expenses for Fiscal Year 1993, such 
expenses to be funded by revenues collected from these activities, 
and to authorize the Town Manager to make expenditures in an amount 
not to exceed $100,000 for FY-1993, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

A report by the Andover Finance Committee was given by Frederic 
Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
56 as printed in the Warrant by a majority vote. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
DISSOLVE the 1992 Annual Town Meeting at 11:00 P. M. 

ATTEST 

('■ I' ■ •/• /' -/' 7 , 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



102 



M6 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Michael J. Connolly, Secretary 

SS. Essex 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Andover. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in 
Elections to vote at: 

Precincts 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 

DUNN GYMNASIUM, ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL 

SHAWSHEEN ROAD, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

AND 

Precincts 1, 3, and a 

SR. CITIZEN CENTER, WHITTIER COURT 

ANDOVER , MASSACHUSETTS 

on TUESDAY, THE 15TH of SEPTEMBER 1992 

7:00 a.m. TO 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their vote in the State Primary for the candidates of 
Political parties for the following offices: 

Representative in Congress Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor Fifth Councillor District 

Senator in General Court Second Essex and Middlesex 

Senatorial District 

Representative in General Seventeenth Essex Representative 

Court District 

County Sheriff Essex County 

County Commissioner Essex County 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings 
thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 10th day of August, 1992 

Gerald H. Silverman 
Charles H. Wesson 
James M. Barenboim 
William T. Downs 
Larry L. Larsen 



Selectmen of Andover 



A true copy 
ATTEST 

John F. Manning Date: August 11, 1992 

Constable 



Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purpose stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of same on the 
Town Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other 
public places where bills and notices are usually posted. Said 
warrants have been seven days. 



John F. Manning 
Constable 



103 



4/ 



118 


110 


124 


129 


89 


96 - 


94 


148 


208 


186 


208 


130 


167 


151 


86 


97 


101 


93 


88 


83 


93 


132 


142 


152 


137 


137 


128 


145 



10 


20 


26 


29 


25 


19 


18 


34 


41 


28 


40 


37 


41 


29 



60 


86 


65 


83 


43 


51 


30 


23 


33 


26 


30 


24 


19 


30 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1992 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY TOTAL : 4056 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS TOTAL 

180 176 209 164 118 151 186 220 Chester G. Atkins 1404 

290 356 339 388 315 311 289 255 Martin T. Meehan 2543 

14 25 15 15 11 12 8 9 BLANKS 109 

COUNCILLOR 

95 Edward J. Carroll 855 
122 Ronald Francis Ford 1320 

96 Ralli Takesian 737 
171 BUNKS 1144 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

18 Paul David Lambert 165 

29 Michael E. McLaughlin, Jr. 279 

357 377 ' 418 385 315 344 376 360 John D. O'Brien Jr. 2932 

44 William X. Wall 462 
33 BLANKS 218 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

77 John J. Desmond, Jr. 585 

303 Ellen T. Murphy 2613 

86 Anthony Raymond Silva, Jr. 732 

18 BLANKS 126 

SHERIFF 

292 346 317 349 262 263 279 277 Charles H. Reardon 2385 

192 211 "246 218 182 211 204 207 BLANKS 1671 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

275 332 325 333 230 246 239 243 Marguerite P. Kane 2223 

45 Walter J. Birmingham, Jr. 296 
73 Christie (Chris) Ciampa, Jr. 513 
21 Albert V. DiVirgilio 198 
35 Karl R. Jansons 281 
112 John V. O'Brien 1098 

421 448 479 448 407 414 447 439 BLANKS 3503 



104 



59 


73 


68 


92 


61 


98 


57 


356 


364 


390 


310 


272 


278 


340 


53 


104 


91 


150 


94 


84 


70 


16 


16 


14 


15 


17 


14 


16 



41 


28 


44 


38 


26 


33 


41 


62 


55 


77 


77 


56 


57 


56 


18 


29 


26 


24 


26 


28 


26 


30 


46 


31 


47 


20 


38 


34 


121 


176 


144 


167 


123 


132 


123 



i 48 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1992 
REPUBLICAN PARTY TOTAL : 2184 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS TOTAL 

52 67 63 79 87 62 84 83 Michael G. Conway 577 
213 200 196 200 190 198 167 204 Paul W. Cronin 1568 

35343858 BLANKS 39 

COUNCILLOR 

215 208 211 223 202 204 199 219 John Patrick Harris 1681 

53 64 51 60 78 64 57 76 BLANKS 503 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

81 74 Brion M. Cangiamila 553 

120 158 James J. Gaffney, III 1121 

55 63 BLANKS 510 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

1952 
232 



65 


82 


64 


66 


51 


70 


122 


128 


128 


153 


174 


138 


81 


62 


70 


64 


55 


60 



243 


240 


231 


257 


241 


243 


236 


261 


Gary M. Coon 


25 


32 


31 


26 


39 


25 


20 


34 


BLANKS 
SHERIFF 


121 


111 


114 


120 


104 


107 


94 


116 


Kevin J. Leach 


87 


99 


91 


111 


112 


100 


113 


125 


Mary Ruth Stocking 














1 











Michael MacLaughlin 


60 


62 


57 


52 


63 


61 


49 


54 


BLANKS 



106 


111 


104 


117 


90 


92 


162 


166 


144 


155 


163 


160 


268 


267 


276 


294 


307 


284 



887 
838 

1 
458 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

100 126 Charles J. Chisholm 846 

137 172 William H. Ryan 1259 

275 292 BLANKS 2263 



105 



i L \y 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 




















3 




















1 





1 























1 

















1 








1 


0. 



STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1992 

INDEPENDENT VOTERS PARTY TOTAL : 10 

8 REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS TOTAL 

Michael Conway 1 

Louise Hart 3 

Martin Meehan 2 

Michael O'Connell 1 

1 BLANKS 3 



COUNCILLOR 
1 BLANKS 



10 



1 

















1 

















3 





2 


1 





1 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

John O'Brien 1 

Erik A. Day 1 

1 BLANKS 8 



1 























Niele Har 


1 





1 

















Gary Coon 


1 























Erik A. Day 


2 





1 


1 





1 





1 


BLANKS 
SHERIFF 

















1 








Michael McLaughlin ■• 


5 





2 


1 











1 


BLANKS 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 


1 























Marguerite Kane 


4 





2 


1 





1 





1 


BLANKS 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

1 
2 
1 
6 



106 



IS 



PRESIDENTIAL/STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 3, 1992 
The total number of ballots cast was 16,927, viz; 



Prec. 1 - 1728 
Prec. 5 - 2390 



Prec. 2 - 2046 Prec. 3 - 2046 Prec. 4 - 2276 
Prec. 6 - 2110 Prec. 7 - 2170 Prec. 8 - 2161 



1 



8 ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT 
AND VICE PRESIDENT 



625 804 7'16 884 918 858 825 859 Bush and Quayle 

758 832 867 863 893 728 874 834 Clinton and Gore 

1 Fulani and Munoz 

3 Hagelin and Tompkins 

LaRouche, Jr. and Bevel 

12 Marrou and Lord 

319 381 432 505 552 499 457 445 Perot and Stockdale 









1 


1 











1 


3 


1 


3 


2 


2 





1 


1 . 


1 


1 


1 


1 





6 


7 


9 


8 


11 


11 


7 



5 





1 


1 








1 





Phillips and Knight, Jr. 





1 




















Robert Perry 








1 





2 








1 


Paul Tsongas 














1 











Nadine Brady 














1 











Jack Kemp 


13 


17 


17 


10 


9 


11 


6 


6 


BLANKS 



TOTAL 

6489 

6649 

3 

15 

6 

71 

3590 

8 

1 

4 

1 

1 
89 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
861 1029 1013 1174 1275 1165 1181 1158 Paul W. Cronin 
633 747 759 844 842 726 756 735 Martin T. Meehan 



42 48 



50 



54 



45 



51 



35 



94 


103 


126 


114 


125 


86 


122 


2 























1 








1 














1 














96 


118 


97 


90 


102 


82 


75 



35 David E. Coleman 

127 Mary J. Farinelli 

Louise Hart 

Michael Conway 

Ed Markey 

106 BLANKS 



8856 

6042 

360 

898 

.2" 

2 

1 

766 



COUNCILLOR 

974 1210 1155 1402 1534 1338 1360 1347 John Patrick Harris 

509 523 582 596 538 473 495 507 Edward J. Carroll 

01 Gail Ralston 

° 1 Robert E. Willard 

245 312 309 278 318 298 315 307 BLANKS 

107 



10320 
4223 

1 

1 
2382 



PRESIDENTIAL/STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 3, 1992 



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

566 726 673 905 1071 897 856 903 James J. Galfney, III 

1020 1146 1179 1229 1135 1059 1172 1084 John D. O^Brien, Jr. 

142 174 194 142 184 154 142 174 BLANKS 



TOTAL 
6597 
9024 
1306 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

803 1019 904 1169 1288 1208 1134 1244 Gary M. Coon 8769 

844 927 1034 1021 982 818 971 832 Ellen T. Murphy 7429 

81 100 108 86 120 84 65 85 BLANKS 729 



















SHERIFF 


875 


1044 


1046 


1089 


1056 


943 


978 


913 


Charles H. Reardon 


586 


710 


673 


881 


977 


869 


899 


920 


Kevin J. Leach 


267 


292 


327 


306 


357 


298 


293 


328 


BLANKS 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 


767 


885 


965 


1004 


951 


853 


904 


865 


Marguerite P. Kane 


446 


542 


504 


626 


728 


637 


681 


725 


Charles J. Chisholm 


490 


567 


544 


623 


605 


495 


551 


510 


John V. O'Brien 


549 


649 


602 


742 


812 


732 


703 


782 


William H. Ryan 


1204 


1449 


1477 


1557 


1684 


1503 


1501 


1440 


BLANKS 
QUESTION 1 


1061 


1222 


1248 


1400 


1579 


1346 


1490 


1367 


Yes 


612 


747 


752 


831 


766 


718 


642 


757 


No 


55 


77 


46 


45 


45 


46 


38 


37 


BLANKS 
QUESTION 2 


780 


869 


975 


1007 


1103 


969 


1022 


977 


Yes 


706 


889 


827 


1030 


1051 


895 


890 


951 


No 


242 


288 


244 


239 


236 


246 


258 


233 


BLANKS 
QUESTION 3 


804 


894 


946 


931 


1056 


934 


1102 


970 


Yes 


854 


1074 


1050 


1292 


1278 


1135 


1031 


1157 


No 


70 


78 


50 


53 


56 


41 


37 


34 


BLANKS 
QUESTION 4 


714 


786 


827 


865 


.972 


846 


932 


859 


Yes 


904 


1135 


1120 


1313 


1331 


1175 


1167 


1212 


No 


110 


125 


99 


98 


87 


89 


71 


90 
108 


BLANKS 



7944 
6515 
2468 

7194 
4889 
4385 
5571 
11815 

10713 
5825 
389 

7702 
7239 
1986 

7637 
8871 
419 

6801 
9357 
769 



53 



j 



PRESIDENTIAL/STATE ELECTION ON NOVEMBER 3, 1992 

QUESTION #1 TAX ON CIGARETTES AND SMOKELESS TOBACCO 

This proposed law would establish a Health Protection Fund to pay 
for health programs relating to tobacco use, including 
distribution of information about tobacco use, to be financed by 
a new excise tax on cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The Health 
Protection Fund would be used, subject to appropriation by the 
state Legislature, to supplement existing funding for the 
following purposes: school health education programs including 
information about the hazards of tobacco use; smoking prevention 
and smoking cessation programs in the workplace and community; 
tobacco-related public service advertising; drug education 
programs; support of prenatal and maternal care at community 
health centers which provide programs on smoking cessation and 
information on the harmful effects of smoking; and monitoring by 
the state Department of Public Health of illness and death 
associated with tobacco. 

The proposed law would establish a new excise tax of one and one- 
quarter cents per cigarette (twenty-five cents per pack of 20) 
and twenty-five percent of the wholesale price of smokeless 
tobacco. This excise would be in addition to the excise already 
imposed on cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The new excise 
would be collected by the state Department of Revenue under the 
same procedures that apply to the existing tobacco excise. 

The proposed law would direct the State Comptroller to report 
annually on the revenues and expenditures of the Health 
Protection Fund. The proposed law states that if any of its 
provisions were found invalid, the other provisions would remain 
in effect. The proposed law would go into effect on January 1, 
1993. 

QUESTION #2 PUBLIC REPORTING OF CORPORATE TAX INFORMATION 

This proposed law would require certain banks, insurance 
companies and publicly-traded corporations to file annual reports 
with the Massachusetts Secretary of State listing information 
from their state tax returns, including profit, income, corporate 
income tax due, deductions, exemptions and credits. These 
reports would be made public. This provision would apply only to 
those banks, insurance companies and publicly-traded corporations 
required by federal and other Massachusetts laws to disclose 
information concerning their federal tax payments. 

The proposed law would also require the annual release by state 
officials of a detailed analysis of certain tax expenditures 
enacted or changed after January 1, 1988. State law defines a 
tax expenditure as an exemption, exclusion, deduction, or credit 
that results in less corporate, sales, or income tax revenue for 
the state. This analysis would be required only for tax 
expenditures with an annual revenue impact of $1,000,000 or more. 
The analysis would include information on the actual revenue 
loss, as well as the number and proportion of taxpayers or 
taxpaying entities benefiting from the tax expenditure, according 
to income, profit, receipts or sales. 

QUESTION #3 REQUIRING REDUCED, REUSABLE OR RECYCLABLE PACKAGING 

This proposed law would require all packaging used in 
Massachusetts on or after July 1, 1996 to be reduced in size, 
reusable, or made of materials that have been or could be 
recycled. The proposed law would provide for exemptions for 
health, safety, and other reasons and. would establish penalties 
for violations. 



109 



54 



PRESIDENTIAL/ STATE ELECTION ON NOVEMBER 3, 19 92 

QUESTION #3 Cont'd 

Packaging would have to be either reduced in size by at least' 25% 
every five years; or designed to be reusable at least five times, 
with at least 50% of such packaging actually being reused; or 
recycled at a 50% rate; or composed of 25% or more of recycled 
materials (increasing to 35% on July 1, 1999 and 50% on July 1, 
2002) ; or composed of materials being recycled at an annual rate 
of 25% (increasing to 35% in 1999 and 50% in 2002). The 
requirements would apply to any packaging or containers used to 
protect, store, handle, transport, display, or sell products. 

These requirements would not be applicable to tamper-resistant or 
tamper-evident seals; packaging for medication or medical 
devices; packaging merely being shipped through the state; 
packaging required by federal or state health or safety laws or 
regulations; or flexible film packaging necessary to prevent food 
from spoiling. 

The state Department of Environmental Protection could also grant 
exemptions for packaging that represents an innovative approach 
for which additional time if needed to meet the requirements of 
the law; or packaging made of material the cannot be reused or 
recycled, and cannot be made of recycled material, but is being 
composted at a significant rate; or products for which there is 
no complying packaging and for which compliance with the law 
would impose undue hardship (other than increased cost) on 
Massachusetts residents. A person applying for an exemption 
would pay a fee to be used, subject to legislative appropriation, 
to pay the cost of administering the proposed law. 

The Department would be required to issue regulations to carry 
out the proposed law and would be required to investigate 
suspected violations. After issuing a warning, the Department 
could assess administrative penalties of up to $100 for each . 
offense and up to $10,000 for any single shipment or single 
continuing act of non-compliance. The state Attorney General 
could also file court actions for civil penalties of up to $500 
for each offense and up to $25,000 for any single shipment or 
continuing act of non-compliance, and could seek a court order 
requiring compliance. Each non-complying piece of packaging 
would be considered a separate offense or act of non-compliance. 

The proposed law states that is any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 

QUESTIONS #4 TAX ON OILS AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 

This proposed law would impose an excise tax- on oil, toxic 
chemicals, and other hazardous substances, and would direct that 
the money raised, along with the fees paid by hazardous waste 
transporters and specific revenues under other state laws, be 
deposited in the State Environmental Challenge Fund. Money in 
the Fund would be used, subject to legislative appropriation, to 
assess and clean up sites that have been or may be contaminated 
by oil or hazardous materials, and to carry out and enforce the 
excise. 

As of July 1, 1993, the excise would apply to persons, 
businesses, and other entities possessing 50,000 pounds or more 
of oil and toxic . chemicals covered by the proposed law. Toxic 
chemicals would be covered if classified as toxic by the federal 
Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) under federal law. 
As of July 1, 1994, substances listed as hazardous by the EPA 
under federal law would also become subject to the excise. 



110 



155 



PRESIDENTIAL/STATE ELECTION ON NOVEMBER 3, 1992 

QUESTIONS #4 Cont'd 

Until June 30, 1995, the excise would be two-tenths of one cent 
($0,002) per pound. In later years, the state Commissioner of 
Revenue would set the excise rate at a level, not to exceed two- 
tenths of one cent per pound, sufficient to yield $35 million 
annually in 1995 dollars. 

The excise would not apply to gasoline or other special engine 
fuels, jet fuel taxed under other state law, number 1 or 2 fuel 
oil, kerosene, animal or vegetable oil, or waste oil classified 
as hazardous waste under the other state law. Nor would the 
excise apply to oils, toxic chemicals, or hazardous substances 
merely being shipped through Massachusetts; or contained in a 
consumer product intended for retail sale; or present in a 
mixture at a concentration of less than one percent; or present 
in hazardous waste being transported by a licensed hazardous 
waste transporter who had paid or will pay a transporter fee 
under state law; or for which the excise tax has already been 
paid under the proposed law and which have not been reprocessed 
or recycled since payment of the excise. 

The excise also would not apply to oils, toxic chemicals, or 
hazardous substances that are possessed by individuals for 
personal, non-business purposes; or are contained in vehicles or 
vessels intended to be used for normal purposes; or are produced 
in Massachusetts as a by-product of pollution control equipment 
or the clean-up of hazardous materials and are handled in 
compliance with federal and state environmental laws. Finally, 
the excise would not apply to toxic chemicals or hazardous 
substances in a manufactured product the use of which requires a 
specific shape or design and which does not release toxic 
substances under normal use. 

Under the proposed law, the excise would ordinarily be collected 
from the first person or business within Massachusetts to come 
• into possession of materials subject to the tax. If that person 
or business had not paid the excise a later possessor could be 
required to pay the excise and could then recover a corresponding 
amount from the first possessor. The proposed law would provide 
credits for excises paid on materials that become ingredients in 
the manufacture of other materials subject to the tax, and it 
would provide credits for similar excises or taxes paid to other 
states. 

Persons possessing more than 25,000 pounds of materials subject 
to the excise in any six-month period would be required to obtain 
a license from the Commissioner of Revenue. The Commissioner 
could issue regulations establising record-keeping and reporting 
requirements for persons possessing such materials. The 
Commissioner would collect the excise through procedures similar 
to those for other state taxes and could issue regulations to 
implement the proposed law. 

The proposed law states that if any of its provisions were 
declared invalid, the other provisions would remain in effect. 



Ill 



156 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 9. 19 9 2 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 



DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



APPR. BY 
ATTY. GEN. 



1. School Building Repairs 
$2,400,000 



Approved 



2. Architectural/Engineering 

Costs for elementary school 
space - $400,000 



Approved 



3. Acceptance of Chapter 133 

Sec. 48 of the Acts of 1992 



Defeated 



4. Establishment of a funding Approved 
schedule for Town's Retirement 
System 



$125,000 for Assessor's Office Approved 
field review 



Retirement benefits 



Withdrawn 



7. Use of free cash to reduce 
tax rate 



Defeated 



112 



157 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 9. 1992 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, October 19, 1992, 
the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in the Town 
Affairs were to meet and assemble at the J. Everett Collins Center 
for the Performing Arts on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1992, 

at 7:00 P.M., to act on the following Articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of 
said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated 
in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on 
the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other 
public places where bill and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

John F. Manning 
Constable 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 1473 voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:05 P. M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Father Arthur Driscoll of St. 
Robert Bellamine Church, Haggetts Pond Road, Andover, 
Massachusetts . 

A salute to the flag was led by Selectman Charles Wesson, Jr. . 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 15 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to dispense with 
reading of the warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number and subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $2,400,000 for school 
building repair projects, or take any other action related thereto. 

A motion was made and duly seconded that the sum of $2,400,000 be 
hereby appropriated for remodeling, reconstructing or making 
extraordinary repairs to public school buildings, including costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
is authorized to borrow not exceeding $2,400,000 under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(3A), of the General Laws, as amended and 
supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds 
or notes of the Town therefor. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Donald Robb. 

A motion was made and duly seconded to amend Article 1 to see if 
the Town will vote to raise by Taxation by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $2,000,000 for school building repair 
projects or take any other action related thereto. 



113 



158 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 9, 1992 

A motion was made and seconded to close debate and was passed by 
more than a 2/3 vote 

The motion to amend Article 1 was defeated by a majority vote. 

The original motion was taken up and Article 1 PASSED by a 2/3 
vote. 

VOTE: YES: 1287 NO: 20 A 2/3 Vote Required 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $400,000 for 
architectural/engineering services and related costs for the 
purpose of preparing working drawings, and bid specifications for 
elementary classroom space for an additional 450 students as a 
continuation of the preliminary design phase now studying the 
following options: 

the renovation, reconstruction, addition to 
the South School, and/or Sanborn School, 
and/or the School Administration Building 
(formerly East Wing of the Junior High School) 
and/or other buildings occupied by the School 
Department, and/or other privately-owned 
buildings; and/ or 

the construction of a new elementary school; 

or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$400,000 be hereby appropriated for architectural and engineering 
services for plans and specifications for the construction, 
reconstruction, remodeling or extraordinary repairs of school 
buildings, including additions thereto, and for costs incidental 
and related thereto, to provide additional elementary school 
classroom space as a continuation of the preliminary design phase 
now studying the following options: 

- renovations and additions to one or more of the South 
School, Sanborn, School Administration Building (formerly 
East Wing of the East Junior High School, and other 
buildings whether or not occupied by the School Department; 
and/or 

- construction of a new elementary school 

and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow not exceeding 
$400,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(21) and 7(22), 
of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Joanne Marden. 

VOTE: YES: 987 NO: 171 A 2/3 Vote required 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions 
of Chapter 133 Section 48 of the Acts of 1992 relative to the 
establishment of an early retirement incentive program for 
municipal employees, or take any other action relative thereto. 



114 



59 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 9, 1992 

A motion was made and duly seconded that the Town vote to accept 
the provisions of Chapter 133 Section 48 of the Acts of 1992 
relative to the establishment of an early retirement incentive 
program for municipal employees. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Virginia Keaten. 

Article 3 "was DEFEATED by a majority vote 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to 
establi h a funding schedule for the Town of Andover Contributory 
Retirement System in such form as the General Court may deem 
appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
that the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for special legislation to establish a funding 
schedule for the Town of Andover Contributory Retirement System in 
such. form as the General Court may deem appropriate. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Margaret Jurgen. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination 
of the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $125,000 for 
the purpose of conducting the Assessor's office field review and 
update of property records and data, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote 
that the Town appropriate the sum of $125,000 from taxation for the 
purpose of conducting the Assessor's Office field review and update 
of property records. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Virginia Keaten. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds or by any combination of the 
foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $220,000 for the 
purpose of paying accumulated leave benefits for employees retiring 
under the provisions of Article 3, early retirement incentive, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

Article 6 was WITHDRAWN 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to require the Assessors 
to use $600,000.00 from Free Cash to reduce the fiscal year 1993 
tax rate. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 7 was moved as printed 
in the warrant. 

A report by the Finance Committee was made by Donald Robb. 

Article 7 was DEFEATED by a majority vote. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel and duly seconded it was voted to 
dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 9:55 P.M. 

ATTEST 

Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

115 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1992 

GROUP I 

INCLUDED IN ASSESSOR'S ESTIMATES 

1992 
ACTUAL REVENUE 

DISTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENTS FROM STATE 3,81 9,632.72 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 2,1 97,623.60 

HOTEL/MOTEL TAX 544,572.00 

LICENSES 160,468.91 

FINES 255,815.50 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 132,999.40 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1 83,31 8.88 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 570,485.79 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 1 03,01 2.50 

SCHOOL 21 ,733.09 

RECREATION 314,073.03 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISED 4,868,706.46 

CEMETERIES 28,260.00 

LIBRARIES 117,508.01 

INTEREST 533,055.27 



13,851,265.16 



GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

TAX TITLE REDEMPTIONS 596,51 1 .44 

TAX TITLE COSTS 871 .22 

RESTITUTION OF DAMAGES . 4,402.27 

BID DEPOSITS 305.00 

RENTAL OF TOWN PROPERTY 21 ,043.50 

DEPARTMENTAL REIMBURSEMENTS 208,921 .41 

IN LIEU OF TAXES 2,01 6.00 

SALE OF SURPLUSS EQUIPMENT 0.00 

MISCELLANEOUS ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 50,055.30 

PETTY CASH 1 ,575.00 

STATE REIMBURSEMENT 0.00 

FEDERAL REIMBURSEMENT 0.00 

CHAPTER 90 231 ,61 5.00 



1,117,316.14 



116 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1992 

GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

DEFERRED TAXES 

TRUST FUND 

MATURITIES OF INVESTMENTS 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 

TAIUNGS 

FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING 

ENTITLEMENTS 

INVESTMENT INCOME 
SEWER RATES 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM -ELDERLY 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM -STATE 
SCHOOL AID 
TOWN GRANTS 
DOG LICENSES TO COUNTY 
SALE OF DOGS 
FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 
WETLAND FEES 
OFF STREET PARKING METERS 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 
ATHLETIC PROGRAM 
MUSIC DEPARTMENT USER FEES 
CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 
CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS 
CEMETERY FLOWER FUNDS 
COUNCIL ON AGING REVOLVING 
POLICE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
FIRE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
SALE OF TRASH BAGS 
GUARENTEE DEPOSITS 
MEALS TAXES 

INSURANCE CLAIM REFUNDS 
CH 71 SEC 71 E CUSTODIAL 
BUS TRANSPORTATION FEES 
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES 
TEMPORARY LOAN-FED AID 
BOND ISSUE PRCEEDS 
REVENUE ANTICIPATION LOANS 
ACCRUED INTEREST ON BOND PROCEEDS 
PREMIUM ON BONDING PROCEEDS 



GRAND TOTAL 





1992 




ACTUAL REVENUE 




735,246.74 




39,267,057.90 




1,565.16 




1 ,093,380.76 




17,998,770.45 




7,343,596.89 




0.00 


0.00 


0.00 




2,225,349.37 


19,097.05 




118,839.16 


137,936.21 




410,609.81 




169,717.33 


O.CO 




135.00 




12,953.50 




412.50 




65,193.81 




510,791.20 




36,017.32 




5,352.40 




20,320.00 




10,160.00 




0.00 




183,560.41 


844,896.14 


463,892.48 




3,505.00 




0.00 




2,241 .87 




1,517.26 


471,156.61 


254.08 




65,512.06 




207,447.25 




1 ,677,500.00 




806,048.00 




0.00 




0.00 




0.00 




0.00 


2,756,761 .39 




73,456,044.76 




88,424,626.06 



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121 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 1992 





GENERAL 


CAPITAL 


SPECIAL 


LT DEBT 


GRAND 




FUND 


PROJECT 


REVENUE 


GROUP 


TOTAL 


ASSETS 












Cash and Equlvelants 


3,786,847.40 


917.685.41 


1,023.428.58 




5,727,961.39 


Other Investments 












Accounts Receivables: 












Property Taxes 


1,882,156.35 








1,882,156.35 


Excise Taxes 


391,496.88 








391,498.88 


Water & Sewer Charges 


822.391.34 








822,391.34 


Tax Liens 


1,641,356.84 








1,641,356.84 


Deferred Tax 


41,123.22 








41,123.22 


Departmental Revenue 


70,067.00 








70,067.00 


Special Assessments 


621,362.29 






. 


621,382.29 


Due from other Governments 


6,542.73 


0.00 


575.258.00 




581,800.73 


Total Cash & Receivables 


9,263,366.05 


917,685.41 


1.598,686.58 


0.00 


1 1 ,779,738.04 


Other Assets 












Tax Possessions 


67,408.27 








67,408.27 


Amounts to be Provided for: 












Bond Anticipation Notes Payable 


0.00 




390,048.00 




390,048.00 


Long Term Obligations 


0.00 


1,677,500.00 




27,487,750.00 


29,165,250.00 


Total Assets 


9,330,774.32 


2,595,185.41 


1,988,734.58 


27,487,750.00 


41,402,444.31 


LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 












Trust Funds 


(75.420.76) 








(75,420.76) 


. Accrued Payroll Withholdings 


(175.529.54) 








(175,529.54) 


Reserve for Abatements 


(365,656.22) 








(365,656.22) 


Deferred Revenue 


(4,221,172.02) 


0.00 


(575,258.00) 




(4,796,430.02) 


Due to Other Governments 


(1,040.25) 


0.00 


(652.07) 




(1,692.32) 


Unclaimed Items 


(62, 190.04) 








(62,190.04) 


Excess on Sales of Low Value Land 


(4,305.74) 








(4,305.74) 


Guarantee Deposits 


(31,569.01) 








(31,569.01) 


Bond Anticipation Notes 


0.00 


(1.677,500.00) 


(390,048.00) 




(2,067,548.00) 


Bonds Payable-Inside Debt Limit 


0.00 






(8,617,500.00) 


(8,617,500.00) 


Bonds Payable-Outslde Debt Limit 


0.00 






(9,987,500.00) 


(9,987,500.00) 


Lease Obligations 


0.00 






(8,882,750.00) 


(8,882,750.00) 



Total Liabilities 



(4,936,883.58) (1,677,500.00) (965,958.07) (27,487,750.00) (35,068,091.65) 



Fund Balances 
Unreserved 
Reserved for: 

Continued Appropriations 

Encumbrances 

Reserve for Special Purposes 
Designated for: 

Over/Under Assessments 

Appropriation Deficits 

Unprovided for Abates & Exempts 

Total Fund Balances 
Total Llab. & Fund Balance 



(2,493.986.44) 



794,774.34 (1,041,605.79) 



(171,134.33) (1,599,600.54) 
(1,617,857.11) (112,904.94) 

(40.000.00) 



20,009.00 

0.00 

(90,921.86) 



45.73 



0.00 
(8,475.70) 



27,304.98 



(4,393,890.74) 



(917,685.41) (1,022,776.51) 



(2.740,817.89) 

(1,770,734.87) 

(1,739,237.75) 

(40,000.00) 

20,009.00 
27,350.71 
(90,921.86) 



0.00 (6,334,352.66) 



(9,330,774.32) (2,595,185.41) (1,988.734.58) (27,487,750.00) (41,402,444.31) 



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127 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1 992 



Employees' Payroll Deductions 

State Grants 

Refunds: 

Real Estate Taxes 
Personal Property Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Taxes 
Water Rates and Services 
Sewer Charges 
Interest and Demands 
Parking Tickets 
Miscellaneous 

Petty Cash 

Off-duty Work Details 

Miscellaneous Trust Funds 

Conservation Trust Fund 

Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 

Unemployment Compensation 

Insurance Fund 

Fishing Licenses to State 

Walter Raymond Fund 

Lucy Shaw Fund 

Police Department Drug Abuse 

Investment Funds 

Temporary Borrowing 

School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Andover Athletic Program 

Music Revolving 

Telethon Revolving 

Community ASK Revolving 

Bus Transportation Revolving 

Meropolitan Life Revolving 

Physical Education Revolving 

DCS Activities Revolving 

Chapter 71 Sec 71 E 

Council on Aging 

Tailings 

Meals Taxes 

Tax Title Expenses 

Chapter 90 Funds 

Community Garden Project 

DCS Program Fees 

Frontage Road 

Fireworks (Gifts) 

SHED Contribution 

TOT Lot 

Old Town Hall Restoration 

Court Judgements 

Guarantee Deposits 

Miscellaneous 



7,257,903.01 
593,617.67 



608,685.95 

89.69 

30,304.45 

12,932.76 

10,020.15 

91.00 
13,555.64 



52,609.62 

921.97 

803,910.00 

30,771.95 

217,127.53 

47,756.40 

11,913.25 

80.00 

920.75 

180.96 



362,536.68 
279,433.86 



675,679.64 

1 ,575.00 

468,816.54 



1,166,192.43 

18,216,794.99 

2,042,000.00 



641,970.54 

41,001.40 

4,045.18 

2.49 

2,249.41 

206,980.97 

2,955.61 

1,585.00 

2,188.98 

44,268.22 

30,665.70 

130.46 

1 ,232.55 

17,167.49 

159,048.48 

569.83 

28,047.04 

40,116.05 

10,000.00 

3,575.00 

1 ,622.80 

9,639.66 

887,722.83 

32,559,364.97 



128 



ARTICLE 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

June 30, 1992 

PROJECT NAME 



AUTHORIZATION 



ART 1 A, 1 987 WATER TREAT PLANT EXPANSION 

ART 1 8, 1 985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 37, 1 987 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 

ART 20, 1 989 SHED TEMPORARY CLASSROOMS 

ART 25, 1 989 ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 

ART 28, 1 989 SEWER-LOWELL ST/WEST PARISH DR 

ART 31 , 1 989 ENGINEERING SPECS 

ART 32, 1 989 STORM DRAINS 

ART 33, 1 989 SEWER -NORTH STREET 

ART 46, 1 990 TRAFFIC SIGNAL FRONTAGE/DASCOMB 

ART 41 , 1 991 NORTH STREET SEWER 

ART 43, 1 991 STORM DRAINS 

Art 46, 1 992 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 

ART 52, 1 992 SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 53, 1 992 BANCROFT PUMPING STATION 

ART 55, 1 992 SCHOOL COMMITTEE - PLANNING 



65,721.47 

1,160,000.00 

1 ,300,000.00 

90,000.00 

150,000.00 

200,000.00 

500,000.00 

100,000.00 

80,000.00 

110,000.00 

280,000.00 

325,000.00 

2,670,000.00 

400,000.00 

1 ,000,000.00 

220,000.00 
8,650,721.47 



129 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1992 

ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. , Ch. - 1995 

William T. Downs - 1993 

Larry L. Larsen - 1994 

James M. Barenboim - 1994 

Gerald H. Silverman - 1995 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Susan E. Jenkins, Ch. - 1994 

Christopher Outwin - 1993 

Susan T. Dalton - 1994 

William J. Huston, Jr. - 1995 

Mary Kelvie Lyman . - 1995 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Mary Jane Powell, Ch. - 1993 

Ronald C. Hajj - 1994 

Eileen M. Connolly - 1994 

John P. Hess - 1995 

Hartley M. Burnham* - 199 6 
* Appointed by Commissioner 
of Dept. of Comm. Affairs 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Leo L. Lamcntagne, Ch. , Lawr, 
Joseph Gleason, Andover 
Terrence L. Breen, Methuen 
Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 
Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 
Robert T. McCann, Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



- 1993 



TRUSTEES. CORNELL FUND 

Alcide J. Legendre 
John R. Williams 
Edwin F. Reidel 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 1994 

Joan M. Lewis - 1994 

John R. Petty - 1994 

Robert A. Finlayson - 1994 

Donna C. Ellsworth - 1994 
Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



130 



APPOINTIVE 

TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - DR. MARK K. McQUILLAN 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Donald W. Robb, Ch. 
Virginia S. Keaten 
Gerald T. Mulligan 
Joanne F. Marden 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald 
Margaret I . Jurgen 
Anthony Sakowich 
Donald F. Schroeder 
Thomas E. Fardy 



PLANNING BOARD 

John J. O'Brien, Ch. 
Hooks K. Johnston, Jr. 
Michael H. Miller 
Mariann Lombardi 
Susan W. Alovisetti 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

C. Ryan Buckley, Ch. 
Pamela H. Mitchell 
Paul Bevacqua 
Daniel S. Casper 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 
Jane E. Griswold 
Peter F. Reilly 
Alan R. Shulman 
John F. Bradley II 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John R. Williams, Ch, 
Robert R. Schmidt 
Christine Holmes 



TRUSTEES. MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Patricia H. Edmonds, Ch. 

Martin Klein 

Thomas J. Swift 

Laurence J. Lamagna 

Ruth M. Dunbar 

Karen M. Herman 

Maria A. Rizzo 

Joseph A. Glasser, Emeritus 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William J. Krajeski 
Archibald D. Maclaren 
John R. Petty 

TOWLE FUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 

Thomas P. McClearn, Ch. 
Donald J. Harding 
Christopher S. Doherty 
Ellen A. Zipeto 
William B. Maren 

MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pustell, Ch 
Phillip F. Wormwood 
Donald D. Cooper 
Scott Matsumoto 
Mark S. Curtin 
Judith M. Chupasko 
Paul J. Finger 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
Dr. Stephen Loring 
John R. Kruse 

GR. LAW. SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John S. Sullivan, Ch. 

Karen M. Herman 

Norma A. Gammon 

Ellen A. Zipeto 

Stephen W. Kearn 

John S . Dugger 

Frank J. Bryne 

Phillip K. Allen, Ch. Emeritus 



131 



ANPOVER CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Ron Wackowski, Ch. 
John F. Zipeto 
Margaret A. Pustell 
Teresa Morgan 
Anne M. Sullivan 
Gail L. Ralston 
Selma P. Flieder 



CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Leonard Wilson, Ch. 
Innocenzo Fossella 
Richard Chapell 
Barbara Maren 
David Murphy 
Peter Green 
Peter Mullett 

RETIREMENT BOARD 

William T. Downs 
Mary Kelvie Lyman 
Rodney P. Smith 

SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Gropper, _Ch. 

James M. Marsh 

Susan Davis Ickes 

Douglas S. Hamilton 

Justin R. DeMarco 

Marjorie E. Dennis 

William J. Marlow 

Nancy Stolberg 

David Reilly* 

*School Committee's Designee 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Annetta R. Freedman 
John R. Dempsey 
Barbara Worcester 
James P. Murphy 
James M. Lyman 

INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Michael W. Morris 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
Robert A. Finlayson 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP/FAIR HOUSING COMM. 

David Hastings 
Christopher D. Haynes 
Lorene A. Comeau 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 
Richard J. Bowen 
John C. Doherty 
Harold F. Hayes 
John Milne 
Edward J. Morrissey 
James M. Bamford 
William C. MacKenzie 
James Deyermond 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 

Helen A. Watkinson 

William L. Lane 

Doreen Correnti 

Paul L. Twomey 

Oscar Rosenberg 

Arthur W. Smith 

William Mueller 

Doris Hudgins 

William T. Ryan 

Thomas F. Powers, Emeritus 

Robert P. Kenney, Emeritus 

WATER CONSERVATION COMMITTEE 

David E. Bales 

Albert Robbat, Jr. 

Charles F. Dalton,Jr. 

Mary Clark Webster 

C. Joyce Ringleb 

Katherine E. Kloss 

Richard J. Bowen 

Robert E. McQuade - Ex Officio 



SHED BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Paul Finger 
Lois Karfunkel 
Molly Marsh 
Judy Rogers 
Kim Yoshida 

DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 



COMM. ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 

Andrew A. Shea 
Myron H. Muise 



132 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 

Gilbert J. Cromie 
Charles A. Bergeron 
Paul W. Cronin 
Rebecca A. Backman 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Lawrence J. Hesenius, Jr. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director. ............ James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Inspector of Buildings '. Sam J. DeSalvo 

Director of Planning Stephen L. Colyer 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Theresa Melillo (Acting) 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Chief Assessor William J. Krajeski 

Collector/Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

Data Processing Manager Barbara D. Morache 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veterans Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief Harold F. Hayes 

Game Warden . Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James W. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla 

Housing Authority Executive Director Nancy M. Marcoux 

Municipal Maintenance Director Frederick L. Jaeschke 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forester (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) James M. Bamford 

PHE/Vehicle Maint. Superintendent James J. Brightney 

Personnel Director Candace Hall 

Police Chief. .... James F. Johnson 

Animal Control Officer Wayne D. Nader 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Town Engineer . •. . John Avery, Jr. 

Memorial Hall Library Director Nancy C. Jacobson 

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Mark K. McQuillan 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk . Randall L. Hanson 

Town Counsel . Thomas J. Urbelis 

Town Manager Reginald S. Stapczynski 



133 



***************** 
HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators; 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617) 565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 02114 

(617) 565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

11 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

(508) 459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202) 225-3411 

State Senator; 

John D. O'Brien, Jr. (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

107 High Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 520, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-1481 

State Representative; 

Gary M, Coon (R) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

C-l Colonial Drive, No. 6, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 541B, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2489 



134 



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HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

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Mailing Address; 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 

8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 

Telephone Numbers: 



Town Offices 

DCS Classes & Activities 
Department of Public Works 
Police Department 
Fire Department 
Emergency - Police/Fire 
Memorial Hall Library 
Senior Center 
Superintendent of Schools 
Personnel Office 



Andover's Population: 31,076 



Square Miles: 



470-3800 

470-3800 ext. 

475-6980 

475-0411 

475-1281 

475-1212 

475-6960 

470-3800 

470-3800 ext. 

470-3800 ext. 

32 



280 



401 
408 



Recycling : 



Curbside Pickup: 



Every other week - recyclables (glass - clear, 
green & brown - newspapers, magazines and 
button & rechargeable batteries) will be 
collected on the same day as the trash 
collection. Place recycling bin curbside by 
7:00 A.M. on your pick up day. 



Recycling information & complaints: 



Call Waste Management, Inc. 
1-800-562-0321 



Recycling Site: 



Compost Site: 



Third Saturday of each month at West 
Middle School from' 9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 
Plastics, aluminum materials and metal 
cans (crush and flatten) . 

High Plain Road (Bald Hill area) . Leaves 
and grass clippings. Open year round for 
walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local 
newspapers . 



135 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: Vining Disposal at 1-800-432-9996 
Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: 



How to dispose of an applicance: 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



When are taxes due: 



Highway Department at 475-3580 or 
Dept. of Public Works at 475-6980 

Appliances can no longer be left 
curbs ide with your trash - their 
disposal is the homeowner's 
responsibility. Suggestions for 
disposal: call Massachusetts 
Electric Company's Appliance 
Recycling Program at 1-800-962-3939, 
hire a private contractor or check 
with the company where your new 
appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



$14.10 - Residential and Open Space 
$18.36 - Commerical/Industrial & Personal 
Property 

Taxes are due quarterly on the following 
dates: 



August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 
Excise tax information: Call Assessor's Office at 470-3800 ext. 305 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Voter Registration Information: 



Town Election is held the fourth Monday 
of March. Andover has an Open Town 
Meeting which is generally held three 
weeks following the Town Election. 

Town Clerk's Office 470-3800 ext. 320 



Where to obtain a Birth Certificate: Town Clerk's Office 



Where to obtain a Marriage License: Town Clerk's Office 



Where to obtain a Fishing & Hunting License: Town Clerk's Office 



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WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and 
comments about our municipal services and policies, or any general 
comments you may have about the Town of Andover. Please let us 
know what you think on this survey and return it to: 

TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

3 6 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 





Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 
Chairman, Board of Selectmen 




Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name and address 
(Optional) 



137 



INDEX 



Animal Control 34 

Animal Inspection 43 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Community Dev. & Planning 58 

Building Division 58 

Conservation Division 60 

Electrical Inspection 59 

Health Division 61 

Planning Division 63 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 59 

Zoning Board of Appeals 64 

Community Services 43 

Council on Aging 55 

Directory of Town Officials 130 

Directory of Dept./Div. Heads 133 

Emergency Management 34 

Finance & Budget 16 

Assessors 16 

Central Purchasing 17 

Collector /Treasurer 19 

Data Processing 18 

Veterans Services 19 

Financial Statements 116 

Fire Department 32 

Greater Lawr. Voc. Tech. HS 56 

Gr. Lawr. Sanitary District 53 



Historical Commission 66 

Housing Authority 65 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 26 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 26 

Memorial Hall Library 30 

Municipal Maintenance 44 

Building 45 

Forestry 47 

Parks 46 

Plumbing, Heating & Electrical 48 

Spring Grove Cemetery 47 

Vehicle Maintenance 48 

Police Department 33 

Public Works Department 50 

Engineering 50 

Highway 51 

Sewer 52 

Solid Waste 52 

Water 53 

Recycling Committee 54 

School Department 7 

Town Clerk 15 

Town Counsel 64 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 68 

Tr. Punchard Free School 27 



We Would Like To Hear From You 137 



VISION STATEMENT 

The Town of Andover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its 
legacy of democracy shall be preserved. Each citizen should 
experience the treasures of nature, history, individual respect, neighborhood, 
and learning. As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the 
past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 

TOWN OF ANDOVER BOARD OF SELECTMEN